ANANTAPUR

 

 

Sl. No.

Contents

1

HR

2

PIP

3

Institutional Building

4

Capacity Building, workshops, Exposure visits

5

Details of MTCs/TTDC

6

Micro Finance

7

CIF, Livelihood interventions and Value Chains

8

Convergence with LD & PRIs

9

Gender

10

Health, Nutrition & Disability

11

Finance

12

ICT

13

Land

14

Youth Empowerment

15

RCL

16

Child labour

17

Monitoring & Learning

18

Communication & Partnerships.

19

Environmental Aspects

20

Best Practices/ success stories / challenges

21

Any other issues

22

Procurement

 


 

 

WORLD BANK MISSION;  MAY 2005

ANANTAPUR DISTRICT NOTES

 

 

HUMAN RESOURCES

 

RECRUITMENT

HUMAN RESOURCES AVAILABILITY
Sl.
No.
Designation particulars
No.of posts sanctioned
No.of posts positioned
% of
 
On deputation basis
On contract basis
Total
positioned
Govt.Staff working on deputation basis
Contract staff working on contract basis
Action proposed for vacancies
1
Project Director
1
1
0
1
100%
0
 
2
Asst.Project Directors
4
0
0
0
0
0
Proposals submitted SERP, to fill up (3) APDs vacancies
3
District Project Manages
11
2
3
5
40%
60%
Proposals sent to SERP to fill up the vacancies 1.DPM-I.B, 2)DPM-C.B., 3)DPM-Gender, 4)DPM-M&L and  5)DPM., Communications posts
4
Asst.Project Managers
32
15
17
32
47%
53%
Out of 32 APMs

16 EO.- DWACRA of DRDA are appointed  to act as APMs

5
Livelihoods Associates
6
0
7
7
0
100%
 

 

1

2

3

4

Sl.
No.

Designation particulars

No.of posts sanctioned

No.of posts positioned

% of

 

On deputation basis

On contract basis

Total
positioned

Govt.Staff working on deputation basis

Contract staff working on contract basis

Action proposed for vacancies

6

Supporting Staff

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

Senior Assistants

0

12

0

12

100%

0

 

2

Drivers

0

2

1

3

67%

33%

 

3

Attenders

0

5

5

10

50%

50%

 

4

Watchman

0

4

0

4

100%

0

 

5

Computer Assistants

3

0

5

5

0

100%

 

6

Receptionist

0

0

1

1

0

100%

 

7

Office Assistants

0

0

1

1

0

100%

 

8

MYCS

0

0

0

0

0

0

 

9

HN CCs

5

0

5

5

0

100%

 

10

MBKs

0

0

203

203

0

100%

 

11

CDWs

0

0

21

21

0

100%

 

12

Botanists

3

0

1

1

0

33%

 

13

CCs

203

0

167

167

0

82%

 

14

Community Volunteers

0

0

39

39

0

100%

 

 

TOTAL

 

41

476

517

8%

92%

 

 

 

Text Box: These two items are covered in detail at Item Nos.3 & 4 (i.e., IB & CB)

 

b) Training/Exposure visits/Workshops at DPMU:

 

c) Trainings by DPMUs to MMs:

d) Grievances/Challenges pertaining to HR:

 

 

There are no grievances/challenges worth mentioning except enhancement in their wages and providing two wheelers to CCs.  The field functionaries are expecting more perks than what they are now offered.  Due to rigorous fieldwork, they are expecting more FTA.

PARTICIPATORY IDENTIFICATION OF POOR

Two types of surveys were carried out to access the degree of poverty of households in the district.  They are 1) Household Survey, which was conducted during 2001-2003 and 2) Participatory Identification of Survey (PIP) in 2003 on par with other districts in the State.  The entire data was computerized in all respects and District Poverty Document will be published after receipt of clearance from the SERP.

        As per PIP data 4,06,220 families were identified as BPL families (i.e., 1,32,682 POP families + 2,73,538 POOR families = 4,06,220 eligible families).  In total  6,65,693 households are enumerated in the district.

        Out of 4,06,220 POP/Poor identified in the district so far 3,53,772 families were covered in 29,221 SHGs.

        To bring the left over poor of 52,448 families in to SHGs with in a span of 6 months, an action plan is prepared and specific monthly targets have been fixed and communicated to Community Co-coordinators to finish this task.

        CCs are also instructed to utilize the services of all field functionaries like Social Activists, CRPs etc and take the guidance of Assistant Project Managers & DPMs to accomplish this mammoth task. 

        The services of existing SHG, V.O. and MS members are also being utilized in motivating the leftover poor to bring them under SHG fold.

        Soft copies have been supplied to various Government Institutions like B.C. Corporation, S.T. Corporation, S.C. Corporation, District Panchayath Office, Forest Department, APRLP, DWMA, MRO Offices etc.

        CCs are also supplied with habitation wise details of POP/Poor/Middle/Rich.  No major complaints were received from the CCs.

        PIP-BPL data has been submitted to SPMU for verification and testing up to               3.11 and there are no mistakes.

        The data is also tested for Version 3.12 and submitted to SPMU on 05-10-04.

 

ABSTRACT OF PIP/HOUSEHOLD SURVEY CATEGORYWISE CARRIED OUT IN ANANTAPUR DISTRICT

Sl.

No.

Caste Category

POP

Poor

Middle

Rich

Total HHs

TARGET GROUP i.e.,
Total of POP+Poor)

(BPL Families)

1

SC

49233

53570

6158

1954

110915

102803

2

ST

13977

18141

3681

1666

37465

32118

3

BC

53643

146034

83211

55072

337960

199677

4

GENERAL

15829

55793

48665

59066

179353

71622

 

TOTAL

132682

273538

141715

117758

665693

406220

Institutional Building

 

OBJECTIVES

 

Rational

 

An appraisal of the performance of the Component

Institutional Building process is having multi dimensional approach. The key components of Institutional Building are

 

IDENTIFICATION OF POP:  During the year 2004-05, 4,06,220 POP/POOR families were identified by adopting PIP techniques in 112 clusters and House Hold survey was deployed in 93 clusters.  After initial survey triangulation has been done with other 5 key registers.  The Nodal Team has validated this data at Gram Sabha.  After completing all steps the total poor families identified in the District are 4,06,220. The entire data has been computerized and make ready for publication.  This data is supplied and being utilized by various departments in the district in implementation of various government welfare programmes.

 

Formation of New SHGs, VO and MS

 

Strengthening of CBOs

SOCIAL CAPITAL

HUMAN RESOURCE SUPPORT

Institution Building is process oriented.  The effective implementation of the process depends on the availability of support structure at each level. The important Human Resource Support required in promoting self managed CBOs are    

        Social Activists / Community Resource Persons at SHG level for motivation, mobilization and handholding and capacity building.

        Book Keepers at SHG level to concentrate on Book Keeping

        Animator at Village level to facilitate SHGs functioning, maintenance of VO Book of Accounts.

        Master Book Keepers at Mandal Level to assist and train Book Keepers and conduct internal auditing periodically.

        Mandal Training Coordinators at Mandal Level to cater to various capacity building needs.

        Community Coordinators at cluster level to facilitate the CBOs in becoming self managed groups.

        The District Resource Persons at District Level to concentrate on building capacities of CRPs and CBO leaders at various levels.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Availability of Social Capital in the district:

In all 63 Mandals the important Social Capital existing is

2,198               Social Activists

6,535               Book Keepers

2,483               Animators

1,117               Community Health Activists

   234               Live Stock Activists

   519               Community Resource Persons

   210               Master Book Keepers

63      Mandal Training Coordinator

 

 

 

CRP TRAINING STRATEGY

 

CONCEPT AND STRUCTURE OF COMMUNITY RESOURCE PERSON 

Empowerment of the marginalized people cannot be achieved by mere pronouncements or by some magical waving of a wand. This does not happen quickly. It needs multiple strategies. One hand, capacity building of community based organizations in a continues manner and on the other hand, creation of supportive structures to play a supportive role in all aspects on a sustainable manner is very crucial.

 

In this context, community resource persons structure is a new initiative aimed at moulding potential women facilitators from the marginalized community, who could facilitate to mobilize, strengthen and train a highly potential force of the marginalized women who form the most oppressed section in the society. At present, there are very few women working in the area to take on this challenge in a sustainable manner, which leaves a lacuna that needs to be filled.  The process of community organization is a sensitive and slow process requiring constant nurturing and direction.  So, in an attempt to develop more community facilitators, it was decided to introduce a new initiative called, the Community Resource Persons (CRPs) a new support structure.  So far 519 CRPs were selected and training inputs were given.  These selected CRPs will be given structured training in two slots during the first 3 months, each slot of 5 days. During this time, we are also planning to provide them with opportunities to interact with CBOs of SAPAP mandals. There would also be exposure visits to some of the important women group

 

Parameters for the selection of CRPs   

      Must be a women member

      Having pro poor attitude

      Member from A grade SHG

      Having minimum conceptual clarity on CBOs

      Good articulation skill

      Preference should be given to SC, ST and BC members

      Willing to travel extensively within and outside the mandals

      Having consent from family members.

      Must not be Animator / CHA / VO leaders / MS leaders / SHG leaders.

      Social Activists and SHG members are encouraged to become the CRPs

 

Job description

      CRPs would assist CCs in the formation and strengthening of SHGs and VOs

      Assist CCs in revival and strengthening of defunct SHGs

       Provide assistance to CCs in assessing the Training needs of the CBOs

      Provide support to CCs in strengthening of Model Village Organizations.

      They also assist the CCs of other districts in formation and strengthening of SHGs and VOs.

  Terms and conditions

      The services of the CRPS will be utilized by the mandal Samakya based on the need for the capacity building of the CBOs.

      The remuneration of the CRPs in the initial stage will be borne by the organization and once CBOs are financially stabilized, CBOs will make the payment.

      Minimum of 20 days work will be provided to CRPs.

      Rs.100 will be paid per CRP per day as a Resource Fee.

      Mandal Samaikya will do performance appraisal of CRPs once in 3 months.

      Actual TA will be paid in addition to Resource Fee.

      The Resource Fee of the CRPs will be paid through Mandal Samaikya

      CRPs must attend MSGB members meeting and present their previous months activities.

      CRPs should obtain the permission of Mandal Samaikya before going to other districts.

 

CRPs structure:

To sustain the CRPs structure the following steps has to be taken.

  1. Identification of potential and dynamic youngsters not more than 3 persons per mandal.
  2. Developing multi disciplinary skills
  3. Promoting cost sharing culture by CBOs

 

Registration of VOs, MMSs etc.:

        Out of  2,065 VOs formed in the district so for 1235 VOs were registered under MACS Act.  During the year 2004-05 alone 855 VOs were got registered.  335 Proposals are under process of registration.

        Out of 63 Mandal Samakhyas existing in the district 7 were registered. 

Achievement:

        In 63 Mandals identification of POP has been completed and 4,06,220 families have been  identified as poor.

        3,53,772 poor house holds are facilitated to form in to 29,221 SHGs

        60% existing SHGs were brought in to A grade

        2,065 Village Organizations have been formed with 27,759 SHGs.

        63 Mandal Samakhyas have emerged in the District with all these 2,065 VOs

        12 MS are in the process of Self Management

        One Zilla Samakhya has been formed with 63 Mandal Samakhya as its members.

        519 Potential leaders were promoted as Community Resource Persons and 176 were trained and were sent to other villages.

        6,535 Book Keepers were identified and trained

        210 MBKs were identified, trained and positioned

        63 MTCs have been started and involved in capacity building activities.

        2,483V.O.Animators have been trained and positioned.

 

REVISED STRATEGY:

  1. Revised strategy for Community Coordinators positioning.

Every CC will intensively work only in two villages to create model VOs.

        Action is initiated to fill in the vacant posts of Community Coordinators with the Community Volunteers and qualified MBKs. 

        No further recruitment of Community Coordinators afresh is resorted to.

        24 vacancies of CCs are being filled with the available CVs and MBKs.

        Executive instructions have been issued to all the Community Coordinators to identify two model villages in their respective clusters keeping the parameters in view.

        The process of identification of villages to convert them as model villages in future by various processes oriented methods is completed.  As on today this process has been completed.  The list of identified model villages is finalized and circulated to all the field functionaries of the project for initiating various approved interventions.  The guidelines issued by the SERP in this regard are communicated and are being followed by all the field functionaries in the district.

Strategy for 2005-06

Institution Building Strategy for the year 2005-06 will envisage the following key interventions.

        Building Model VOs and MS

        Promotion of CRPs structure and tie up with CBOs

        Streamlining the Financial Management Practices at SHG level (Micro Credit Plan, and Book Keeping).

        Positioning of Community Volunteers in place of CCs in 12 First phase Mandals

        Developing Village Resource Teams in SAPAP Mandals.

        Handing over the responsibility of management of development of interventions to Mandal Samakhya in 12 first phase mandals.

        Developing AWFP at mandals level.

        Bringing all SHGs into A grade

        Promotion of Social Capital in all Villages

        CBOs will evolve methods to review the performance of lower level CBOs and its staff.

        Uniform code of conduct in 29,221 SHGs (Weekly meetings, regular savings, internal lending and Book Keeping).

 

The above said interventions will lead to emerging strong Community Based Organizations, develop best practices and having spread effect with low cost.

 

District specific interventions if any 

 

CAPACITY BUILDING

 

Objectives: 

  

 

 

Mandate:

 

Rational:

 

In order to bring changes in the above said areas there is a need of Building the Capacities of various key actors is the need of hour.  As Community Based Organizations are viewed as powerful vehicles for change they need to be managed by the poor it self.  Any investment in Capacity building will lead to the poor to emerge has effective organization by optimal utilization of their knowledge, skill and resource base.  These Institutions will take charge of Development process even after the project period is ended. 

 

Project appraisal Document envisages that the Capacities and Skills of the poor are to be utilized in Poverty Eradication through facilitating them to form into Self Managed Institutions. 

 

Human Resource Support: Capacity Building requires the following human resource support for effective implementation of its various components like facilitation, trainings, workshops and exposure visits.

 

 

 

 

Achievements

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Under Capacity Building various trainings and workshop has been conducted in 63 mandals covering SHG members, leaders, and Community Coordinators and Other Social capital.

Sl.

No.

Name of the Programme

No. of Members

1

Orientation Programme to Sarpanchas

905

2

Orientation Programme to line department staff

480

3

Orientation Programme to Community Coordinators

250

4

Trainers Training Course to DRDA Staff

30

5

Social Activist Development Programme

2,198

6

Community Health Activists Development Training Programme

1,117

7

Live Stock Activists Development Programme

234

8

VO Animators Development Training Programme

2,483

9

Book Keepers Development Programme

6,535

10

Master Book Keepers Development Programme

210

11

Mandal Net Work Assistants Development Programme

36

12

District Resource Persons Training Programme

34

13

Mandal Resource Persons Training Programme

720

14

Orientation Programme to CCs on LEAP

220

15

Refresher Training to CCs / APMs on LEAP

220

16

Training to Mater Book-Keepers on LEAP and CBA

99

17

Group Level Development Training Programme

2,00,000

18

Community Resource Persons Training Programme

519

19

VO EC members Development Training Programme

18,008

20

MS EC members Development Training Programme

975

21

Kalajatha Training Programme to MRPs

200

22

Mandal Training Coordinators Development Training Programme

63

 

Total:

2,35,511

 

An appraisal of the performance of the Component:

Capacity Building covers various components as mentioned below. 

    1. Trainings and Workshops
    2. Exposure Visits
    3. Developing Training materials and manuals
    4. Establishing Mandal Training Centres

 

During the years 2001-05, 2,35,511 member were trained in various cadres:

1.      Group Level Trainings 2 Lakhs SHG members has been trained by trained MRPs at Village Level on Poverty, Concept of group, Importance of Book Keeping etc.,  

2.      VO Animators Development training 2,483 VO Animators have been trained for a period of 6 days covering Poverty, Group concept, Skills and Book Keeping

3.      18,008 VO EC members have been trained for a period of three days by District Resource Persons on concept of VO and Financial Management.

4.      905 Sarpanchas, 220 Community Coordinators, 2198 Social Activists, 200 Master Book Keepers, 36 MNAs, 34 DRPs, 720 MRPs, 63 MTCs have been trained on relevant contents of development and their functional area.

 

Exposure Visits:  In 2004-05 17,999 members from 1,529 SHGs has been taken for exposure visits in order to have direct interaction with best practioners and effective group management practices.

 

Developing Training materials and manuals:  For effective implementation of training programmes the following modules have been developed at DPMU level.

TRAININGS

I. Training Strategy for Community Coordinators

As a part of training strategy, the following training programmes to CCs have been conducted in the following areas:

 

A. Orientation Training Programme to Community Coordinators:

To Provide conceptual clarity on various development themes, to enhance their skills and provide great clarity on their roles, a 8 day training program was conducted.

Content Areas:

        Concept of IKP

        Poverty Analysis

        Peoples organizations and its characteristics

        Gender Concept

        Skills

        Role and functions of Community Coordinators

 

  1. Two Day orientation training programme on Village Organizations and Mandal Organizations Concept:

To provide clarity on relevance and importance of VO and MS concept, a two day training program was organized.

 

 

Content Areas:

        Importance and relevance of VO and MS

        Role and functions of VO and MS

        Role and functions of VO EC Members, Office bearers and Members.

 

  1. Orientation Programme to CCs on LEAP:

A three and a half day training program was conducted on following areas:

    1. Analysis of actions that can be taken to reduce the impact of poverty and derive the livelihood framework. 
    2. Focus on tools in analyzing livelihoods
    3. Value chain analysis
    4. Cost benefit analysis
    5. Preparations of sub-projects
    6. Importance of appraisal and conducting appraisal

D.              Orientation Programme to CCs on Bookkeeping:

To make them understand the importance of book keeping at SHG and Village Organization, a four day training program was conducted.

Content Areas:

        Importance of SAP Book keeping at SHG and VO

        Role of Book Keeper

 

E. Proposed Training Programme for CCs

        Planning, Monitoring, Evaluation and Information System

        Financial Management

        Gender Concept

        Group Dynamics and Management

        Asset Management

        Withdrawal Strategy

 

F. Other Training Strategies

        Exposure visits of CCs to other identified districts to observe and understand the best practices

        Identification of supportive and training institutions and deputing CCs to get training programme on various development themes

        Evolving training programmes based on the training needs of the members at different level.

        Inter CC experience sharing meets.

 

II. MASTER BOOK KEEPERS

 

Role and Responsibilities of Master Book Keeper

 

Training:  Selected MBKs will be trained for 7 days by the DPM (MF) DPM and DRPs for 7 days at District Level in PTM IKP concept SHG concept SHG and VO Book Keeping so far 213 MBKs are trained and placed first batch of 110 MBKs are given re-orientation training by the resource persons deputed by the NABARD for period of 4 days. Refresher trainings are being conducted by the DPM (MF) and Accounts Department personnel and audit rating of SHGs Micro Credit Plan, Preparation of DCB etc., The MBKs are reviewed monthly by the Mandal Samakhya and by the DPM (MF) at division level.  

III. Training to Mandal Mahila Samakhyas:  It is proposed to train Presidents/Secretaries and G.B. Members of all Mandal Mahila Samakhyas in phased manner (total 6 days) on MS concept, MS norms, MS objectives, MS management, MACS Act, Financial transactions and on Social issues.  So far training was imparted to 975 MS GB/EC members on the above subjects.

 

IV. Training to VOs :  village Organization Executive Committee Members and Village Organizations Members require training programmes on a continuous basis to make them more and more vibrant.  They will be trained on VO concept, VO norms, VO objectives, VO management, MACS Act and on Social Issues.  So far 18,008 V.O. EC members were provided training on V.O concept and MACS Act etc.

 

V. Trainings to SHGs:   training will be imparted to SHG Members in a phased manner on SHG concept, SHG norms, SHG management, Micro planning, Book keeping and on Social issues.  So far 2,00,000 SHG members were given training in 2 phases in the district on the above subjects.

 

Convergence:  As a part of strategy in promoting and sustaining the people institutions capacity building line departments staff and local bodies members and representatives were also done.   905 Sarpanchas were trained on Panchayat Raj, 73 Amendment, duties and powers of Sarpanch, Role of PRIs in strengthening SHGs.  480 Line Department Staff viz., Mandal Revenue Officers, Mandal Parishad Development Officers, Agriculture Officers, EO DWCRAs etc., were trained on IKP and concept of group. 30 DRDA staff and 50 Bank Officials were also trained on IKP and concept of SHG.

 

ROLE OF SUPPORT ORGANISATION:  Strategic convergence with key line departments: 

 

In building the peoples institutions promoted under IKP (Indira Kranthi Patham) convergence strategy has been planned and implemented in 63 Mandals.

 

        During the year 2004-05 the services of APMAS has been utilized in assessing the efficiency of 7 UNDP mandals, evolving convergence strategy between GO and NGOs and visioning process in one mandal.  Capacity Building can strategically converge with other line departments working with CBOs by evolving appropriate tools to assess their training needs promoting materials various trainings and developing the resource persons.s:  (To b

District specific interventions if any 

In the district Potential leaders from 7 UNDP mandals have been promoted as Community Resource persons and were sent to other districts to strengthen the SHGs.  illage resource teams were constituted and sent to tribal areas.  Each UNDP mandal has adopted one mandal from 2nd & 3rd phase mandals.

 

Sustainability of interventions:  Promotion of Self managed CBOs

Adopting the following strategies can ensure sustainability of CBOs

1.       Promotion of Self regularatory and better management practices at CBO level

2.       Continues Capacity building on CBO management.

3.       Promotion of corpus at CBO level

4.       Networking with PRIs and other safety nets (Insurance etc.,)

5.       Promotion of multi disciplinary CRPs

6.       Developing role clarity among CBOs and promoting agencies.

 

The above said strategies shall be implemented by creating favorable atmosphere at CBO level.

1.      Promotion of collective actions.

2.      Self Help and cost sharing culture

3.      Collective leadership

4.      Effective Problem solving mechanism

5.      Availability of skilled persons from their community.

 

Sustainability of interventions:

The members ensure sustainability of Capacity Building interventions through promoting Community Resource Persons structure with multi disciplines and creation of corpus at CBO level to meet the costs of CB interventions on cost sharing basis.

 

CRPs structure:  To sustain the CRPs structure the following steps have to be taken.

1.      Identification of potential and dynamic youngsters not more than 3 persons per mandal.

2.      Developing multi disciplinary skills

3.      Promoting cost sharing culture by CBOs

 

Sustainability of MTC:  Sustainability of MTC is ensured through equipping the MTC with required infrastructure and Human Resource.  MTC can play vital role in building the capacities of line departments and earn income to meet its management costs.

 

Strategy for 2005-06

Capacity Building Strategy for the year 2005-06 envisages on using the services of Community Resource Persons in building SHGs and VOs.  Potential leaders from 12 first phase Mandals has been identified as external CRPs and after 6 days training they were allotted to Mandals in 3rd phase.  Similarly 6 internal CRPs were also trained and formed in to team to operationalize the capacity building plans.  63 Mandal training centres will take responsibility of evolving relevant modules and monitor group level trainings in their respective mandals.   334 model VOs will be developed by CRPs.  The above said interventions will give scope for promoting strong Community Based Organizations, Develop best practices having spread effect and low cost.

 

DETAILS OF MTCs/TTDC

 

Mandal Training Centers Strengthening:  Mandal Training Centers are established at all 63 mandals in the District.  In order to strengthen the MT Centers, 63 mandal training coordinators are identified, trained and positioned in 2 phases in their respective mandals.  Required training materials and equipped with Audio, Video, other equipment and furniture were provided to all 63 Mandal Training Centers to conduct review meetings and short-term training programmes to different cadres.  Training calendars to all 63 mandals were prepared in consultation with CCs, MTCs and MS Members and displayed at every mandal training centre.   In implementing the training programmes the services of 650 MRPs, 210 MBKs and 34 DRPs have been taken up.

 

Sustainability of MTC: Sustainability of MTC is ensured through equipping the MTC with required infrastructure and Human Resource.  MTC can play vital role in building the capacities of line departments and earn income to meet its management costs.  It is also planned to get free land from revenue department and have a permanent structure and make them available for the CBOs to run long-term trainings.

 

Status of MVTCs

Sl.

No

Activity

Status

 

Total No.of Project Mandals :

63

1

Total No. of MVTCs to be established

63

2

No.of MVTCs established

63

3

No.of MVTCs existing in Govt. buildings

7+1(own building)

4

No.of MVTCs existing in Private Buildings

55

5

Rent per month to be paid to private buildings for MVTCs

Rs.700 to Rs.1500 per month

6

No.of MVTCs having Computers

23

7

No.of MVTCs having telephone connection

45

8

No.of MVTCs having TVs

37

9

No.of MVTCs having VCP

37

10

No.of MVTCs having internet connectivity

37

11

No. of MVTCs having white boards/Black boards

63

12

No.of MVTCs having Training module (Swasakthi, Samruddi, Sankalpa with charts)

63

13

No.of MVTCs commenced trainings

63

14

Total No.of MRPs

630

15

No.of MVTCs having Mandal Training Coordinators

59

16

No.of MTCs trained

63

17

No.of trainings conducted to VOs in MVTCs

2 Rounds of

VO- EC training programmes are being conducted at each MVTCs

18

No. of trainings conducts to MS in MVTCs

0

19

No. of MVTCs prepared Annual training calendars

63

20

No.of MVTCs prepared Monthly training calendars

63

21

No.of CRPs existing

519

22

No.of CRPs trained

519

23

No.of MVTCs prepared and Submitted budget.

63

 

TTDC Operational Plan and strengthening

 

        At present the TTDC is under the management of DRDA.

        DRDA is lending the Conference Halls for conducting meetings to various line departments on rental basis.

        Apart from this, various training programmes of Indira Kranthi Patham, DWMA and DRDA are being held.

        The revenue that is being earned by conducting various training programmes and meetings is being used for its maintainance.

        One A.P.O., assisted by 4 workers is maintaining the building.

        Separate accounts are being maintained.

Micro Finance Initiatives

The economic, social and Cultural upliftment of the rural poor through sustainable self-managed community based organizations is the main objective of Indira Kranthi Patham.  IKP is organizing Self Help Groups at base level, village organization at village level, mandal Samakya at Mandal level and Zilla Samakya at district level.  The success and sustainability of the community based organizations depends on the success of the activities under taken by these organisations, providing financial services I.e. Micro Finance is the main activity. The Community based organizations are under taking the following financial activities.

 

  1. Collection of Savings:

To inculcate the habit of savings by curtailing wasteful expenditure the savings are collected from members at SHG meetings Rs. 5 to Rs. 10 in weekly meetings and Rs. 20 to Rs.50 in monthly meeting SHG are being collected.

 

  1. Internal lending:

The savings amount is being used for internal lending among SHG members. The members are receiving loans from these savings amount for consumption purposes and repay in monthly equal installments with a nominal interest of Rs.1 or Rs.2 per hundred per month.

 

  1. Sources of funds to SHGsRevolving Fund: The DRDA under SGSY and state government schemes providing revolving fund/matching grant to the SHGs.The SHGs adding these amounts to their savings giving loans to the members. So far  12,174 SHGs received Rs.20.40 Crores amount of revolving fund.  During the year 2004-05, 1,427 SHGs received an amount of Rs.1.43 Crores under Revolving Fund.

 

  1. Bank linkage:   SHGs are being linked to banks. Banks are lending loans to the SHGs based on the micro plan and critical rating Index one to four times to the Corpus of the SHGs. So far 37,845  SHGs received an amount of Rs.105.18 Crores under SHG Bank linkage programme.  During the year 2004-05,  10,105 SHGs are given Rs.35.46 Crores amount as bank loans against the target of 12,500 groups and Rs. 50.00 Crores.

 

  1. Community Investment Fund:

IKP is providing financial assistance to SHG members for income generating activities. Leaps are conducted at village level and livelihood activities for each family is identified. Based on the livelihood activity micro plan is being prepared at SHG for all SHG members. Based on the need prioritizations are being made. Based on the SHG micro credit plans a village credit plan is prepared and converted in to a sub project. Sub projects are appraised and sanctioned by DPM. Since inception of the Project an amount of Rs. 5085.53 Lakhs amount is released under CIF through sanction of 2,860 Sub-Projects.

      During the year 2004-05, an amount of Rs.2280.32 Lakhs is released under CIF through by sanctioning of  980 Sub Projects.

 

 Micro Finance process adopted at CBO level.

Extension of Micro Finance services are considered one of the important strategy in strengthen the community based organizations the effectiveness of the CBO in promoting financial activities will be depends on the process followed the important one are:

 

1.                  Introduction of SAP books:

The SERP in consultation with NABARD has finalized standard accounting package for SHGs and VOs in 17000 SHGs and1500 VOs SAP accounting books has been introduced and maintained. 

 

2.                  Positioning of Bookkeepers:

Preferably a female literate member studied 7th class from the SHG or from the village is selected by the SHG/VO as bookkeeper. Training is imparted on SAP books for a period of 5 days at Mandal Training Centers by District Micro Finance Group. The Book keepers are selected  @ of one for 5 SHGs in weekly meeting SHGs and @ one for 10 SHGs. Book keepers are paid by SHGs depending on their transactions from Rs. 20 to Rs.100 per month. 5922 bookkeepers are working.

 

 

3.                  Positioning V.O.Animators:

Preferably a female member studied 10th class is selected as village animator by the village organisation. District Micro Finance Group at division level train the animator for 7 days. Animator writes V.O. books, facilitates SHG meetings, guide the SHG bookkeepers. Animator is being paid by V.O. from Rs.250 to Rs, 1000. There are 1710 Animators working

 

4.                  Master Book keepers:

SHGs and VOs are performing various financial activities.  These activities are recorded in various Books of Accounts. As there is no monitoring on these books of accounts various irregularities are taking place in SHGs and VOs.  To set right these irregularities and to monitor Book keeping in SHGs and VOs, the concept of Master Book Keepers is introduced.  To develop the Master Book Keepers a 7-day development programmes were conducted. Totally 210 Master Book Keepers were trained in batches.

 

Role and Responsibilities of Master Book Keeper:

1.      Imparting trainings to the SHG Book Keepers

2.      Verification (Audit) of SHGs & VOs Books in his cluster once in three months and guides V.O.Animator in writing VO Books, rating of SHGs.

3.      Acts as catalyst in SHG bank linkage.

4.      Assisting the Community Coordinators in preparation of LEAPs

5.      Apprising the CIF Sub-Projects

           

Out come:

1. The Master Book Keepers know about Indira Kranthi Patham SHG norms and VO activities.

2. They equipped with necessary skills in writing and verification of various SHGs books and VO books.

 

5.                  Mandal Network Assistants:

A Mandal Network Assistant in Ist and 2nd phase mandals are appointed. Head quarter MBKs are acting as MNAs in 3rd and4th phase mandals. Mandal network accountant writes Mandal Samakya books, helps MS leaders in management of Mandal Samakhya and maintains bookkeeping system in the Mandal. M.N.A is the employee of the Mandal Samakhya.

 

6.                      The financial efficacy of CBO is assessed by conducting regular audit.  In the district presently two types of auditing is going on.

 

7.                  Internal Audit:

The Master Book keepers are auditing SHGs once in 3 months. VOs and M.S. are audited internally are in 3 months by the DPMU of accounts department and District Micro Finance Group.

 

8.                  External Audit:

V.O. s and M.S. are audited annually by the Charted Accountants.MOU is under taken from four local charted accountants for the audit of VOs and MSs for the year 2003-2004 and audit of 37 M.S.s and 464 V.O.s has been completed.

 

9.                  Monitoring System:

Copies of Transaction Sheets of SHGs are sent by the SHG to the VOs at vs. meeting. VOs monitor the performance of SHGs.V.O. Animator based on the SHG transaction Sheet prepare SHG particulars in the village and V.O. particulars and send to the Master Book keeper. Master Book keeper prepares cluster SHG particulars and V.O. particulars and submits to the Mandal Samakya. Mandal Samakya will monitor the performance of VOs. M.N.A prepared Mandal report and send to the Zilla Samakya and D.P.M.U.

 

10.              Registration of V.O.S, M.S And Zilla Samakya:

Village organizations are being registered under A.P.Mutually aided Cooperative Societies Act 1995 for providing statutory reorganization MS are being registered as V.O. federations under MACS Act 1995.  Out of 2,065 VOs existing in the district so far 1235 VOs were registered under MACS Act.  Out of 63 Mandal Samakhyas existing in the District             7 MSs were registered under this Act.  Zilla Samakya is being registered under A.P.Societies Act.

 

11.              District Micro Finance Group:

As per the instructions of the SERP, Hyderabad district micro finance group has been constituted. The D.M.G. will monitor the book keeping system, appointment of Master Bookkeepers, Animators and Book keepers, The D.M.G. consist of A.G.M., NABARD, Lead bank district Manager, D.P.Ms I.B., C.B., M.F. and DRPs.

 

Flow Chart - Seed Capital Management

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Book Keeping System

 

Member level                                    -                       Individual Pass Book

 

SHG Level                                         -                       Minutes Book (SAP), General Ledger

                                                                                    Transaction Book, SHG Pass Book

                                                                                   

VO Level                                            -                       Minutes Book, Receipt Book

                                                                                    Voucher file,            Cash Book

                                                                                    General Ledger, Loan ledger

                                                                                    Consolidated DCB

 

MS Level                                            -                       Minutes Book, Receipt Book ,

Voucher file,            Cash Book,

                                                                                    General Ledger, Loan ledger

                                                                                    Asset Register, Consolidated DCB

 

CIF Management

Existing                                                                                           Proposed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STATUS OF DEMAND, COLLECTION, OVER-DUE POSITION UNDER CIF:

 

CIF has been sanctioned from MS to VOs based on their Sub-projects.  VOs are sanctioning to SHGs based on their micro plans.  The CIF sanctioned to SHGs and VOs are being repaid on monthly instalment basis as mentioned above at flow chart of Seed Capital Management.    Status of DCB as on 31-03-05 is as follows:

DEMAND COLLECTION BALANCE  OF CIF AS ON 31-03-2005

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Amount in Rs.

 

Sl.
 No.

Mandal

No. VOs

Total CIF Distributed

Amount to be Collected

Amount Collected

Over Due

Outstanding Balance

% of Recovery

1

AGALI

22

2787055

1342165

1090691

251474

1696364

81

2

AMADAGUR

14

1797700

526262

374305

151957

1423395

71

3

AMARAPURAM

22

1540230

439465

317496

121969

1222734

72

4

ANANTAPUR

11

1101150

641663

641663

0

459487

100

5

ATMAKUR

19

5004800

697207

554047

143160

4450753

79

6

B.K.SAMUDRAM

31

8057238

49995

49995

0

8007243

100

7

BATHALAPALLI

21

7264555

852535

646344

206191

6618211

76

8

BELUGUPPA

30

15708632

564488

362616

201872

15346016

64

9

BOMMANAHAL

14

439500

89500

62540

26960

376960

70

10

BRAHMASAMUDRAM

22

5931550

1436090

1321383

114707

4610167

92

11

BUKKAPATNAM

28

8318536

972826

422077

550749

7896459

43

12

C.K.PALLI

9

1092000

632000

622000

10000

470000

98

13

CHILAMATHUR

48

12230796

2837522

1978775

858747

10252021

70

14

D.HIREHAL

8

1869392

476417

272245

204172

1597147

57

15

DHARMAVARAM

7

816000

725500

633000

92500

183000

87

16

GANDLAPENTA 

19

2622290

873220

820328

52892

1801962

94

17

GARLADINNE

10

917775

917775

815756

102019

102019

89

18

GOOTY

25

14528218

3568464

1590116

1978348

12938102

45

19

GORANTLA

23

5462772

1082403

935291

147112

4527481

86

20

GUDIBANDA

31

5791105

1369152

993801

375351

4797304

73

21

GUMMAGATTA

22

5992251

1689844

856051

833793

5136200

51

22

GUNTAKAL

6

1068000

1057150

1057150

0

10850

100

23

HINDUPUR

37

7592278

1785686

938526

847160

6653752

53

24

KADIRI

10

773000

773000

744629

28371

28371

96

25

KALYANDUG

21

6161880

237226

182405

54821

5979475

77

26

KAMBADUR

18

9063966

1675374

876635

798739

8187331

52

27

KANAGANAPALLI

8

1673450

240240

178990

61250

1494460

75

28

KANEKAL

12

3142835

91502

51140

40362

3091695

56

29

KOTHACHERUVU

20

1630000

1630000

1233348

396652

396652

76

30

KUDAIR

18

7348215

1829229

845294

983935

6502921

46

31

KUNDURPI

32

7016004

932208

879119

53089

6136885

94

32

LEPAKSHI

5

537000

537000

434971

102029

102029

81

33

MADAKASIRA

33

9166834

980996

818114

162882

8348720

83

34

MUDIGUBBA

22

1220600

579749

449962

129787

770638

78

35

N.P.KUNTA

15

1112000

461860

376529

85331

735471

82

36

NALLACHERUVU

22

3902400

394442

301790

92652

3600610

77

37

NALLAMADA

18

6023850

3369011

2089558

1279453

3934292

62

38

NARPALA

22

1324980

679021

576945

102076

748035

85

39

O.D.CHERUVU

18

622500

107254

86770

20484

535730

81

40

PAMIDI

7

1458600

248906

246870

2036

1211730

99

41

PARIGI

10

896775

896775

542026

354749

354749

60

42

PEDDAPAPPURU

16

3636629

Recovery installements not commenced

43

PEDDAVADUGUR

22

6058600

1611868

984633

627235

5073967

61

44

PENUKONDA

7

733500

733500

715500

18000

18000

98

45

PUTLUR

17

1469500

1385165

1071571.5

313593.5

397928.5

77

46

PUTTAPARTHI

19

3203200

793820

724745

69075

2478455

91

47

RAMAGIRI

7

1185000

1185000

1029762

155238

155238

87

48

RAPTADU

13

1168963

1088613

982836

105777

186127

90

49

RAYADURG

18

2376230

430991

171554

259437

2204676

40

50

RODDAM

9

651000

444200

444200

0

206800

100

51

ROLLA

21

2912826

594610

540314

54296

2372512

91

52

SERTTUR

27

6667763

350054

202758

147296

6465005

58

53

SINGANAMALA

33

6869836

2110686

1995107

115579

4874729

95

54

SOMANDEPALLI

31

11790853

1492686

819893

672793

10970960

55

55

TADIMARRI

18

9310138

309323

149237

160086

9160901

48

56

TADIPATRI

23

1035250

717987

645014

72973

390236

90

57

TALUPULA

27

6379794

400280

378984

21296

6000810

95

58

TANAKAL

21

3040285

1484266

1321334

162932

1718951

89

59

URAVAKONDA

24

2466000

455612

455612

0

2010388

100

60

VAJRAKARUR

22

9249525

2139866

1208755

931111

8040770

56

61

VIDAPANAKAL

10

10365434

1253096

731444

521652

9633990

58

62

YADIKI

10

693000

693000

511271

181729

181729

74

63

YELLANUR

18

1137450

523971

222701

301270

914749

43

 

 

Work Done So far:

        25,000 SHGs and 2000 VOs are supplied with books of Accounts.

        6,535 Book Keepers have been identified, trained and effectively monitored

        210 Master Book Keepers are positioned to give on job support to BKs.

        3,53,772 Poor house holds are facilitated to develop their Micro Credit Plan.

        Demand, Collection and Balance statements are streamlined.

        12,500 SHGs are graded in to A grade by using CRI tool.

        Bank Linkage: 10,105 SHGs have been linked to bank finance to a tune of 35.46    Crores during the financial year 2004-05.

        All the staff was trained on preparation of DCB statement and Micro Credit Plan.

        15,060 SHGs has under gone training on importance of Book Keeping.

        18,008 VO EC members were given orientation on MACS Act.

        1,235 VOs have been registered under MACS Act.

Strategy for 2005-06:  Micro Finance strategy for the year 2005-06 focuses on

  1. Streamlining the Book Keepers structure and Book Keeping system.
  2. Micro Credit Plan based CIF and Bank Linkages.
  3. Revival of Management Information system at each CBO level.
  4. Annual audit by external agencies.
  5. Regularizing the DCB at CBO level.
  6. Registering VOs under MACs.
  7. Micro Credit Plans in all SHGs.
  8. Annual auditing. 

 

The above said interventions will lead to sound financial management systems at SHG, VO and MS level and in turn contributes for building strong Community Based Organizations, Develop best practices and having spread effect with low cost.

 

District specific interventions if any 

Micro Finance strategy focuses on

  1. Promotion of Book Keepers among CRPs.
  2. Constitution of Village Organization Resource Team with expertise in Micro Finance.

 

CIF, Livelihood Interventions and Value Chains:

Objectives:

 

Preparation of Sub-Projects:

 

What is CIF?  What is Sub-Project?

Any intervention that is going to address the Poverty of the Poorest households very significantly can be Community Investment Fund (CIF) and the activity under taken as a means to address the Poverty problems of the poor can be a Sub-Project under CIF.  Therefore the amounts incurred an execution of Sub-Projects for addressing the problems of Poverty of the poor households constitutes the CIF Sub-Projects.  

 

With a view to support investments in Sub-Projects proposed by peoples organizations for the benefit of poor Communities the activities are taken up for:

 

To accelerate and expand the involvement of the poor in social and economic activities of the Community demand driven activities through CIF have been taken up in the district.  People are facilitated to prepare Sub-Projects for taking up identified activities.  In the process, they are made to realize and take in to account both the physical and financial resources.  The Community for their development evolves the Sub-Projects. The people are the evolvers, implementers and beneficiaries.  All the Sub-Projects are demand driven.  They emerge from the discussions among members.    

 

People with common interest come together and form into Common Interest Group.  The Sub-Projects are prepared with the assistance of Community Coordinators.   They satisfy the parameters like productivity, equity and sustainability.  They do not cause any burden to the women and children.  Nor do they create any loss to other poor households.  They have the approval of the Gram Sabha and ensure the benefit to the poorest of the poor.  They have technical soundness and simplicity.  Normally they are labour intensive and are easily managed by Community.  Then CC gives his appraisal report.  The Sub-Project prepared by the people will give us details like the activity, resources available, budget estimates and procurement of finances, raising the Community contribution 5% by way of cash and 5% by way of labour/material, financial assistance tapped from other sources, the strategy and stages of implementation adopted.  The Community contribution has been a must for implementing the Sub-Projects to enhance participation, transparency, responsibility and sustainability.  Then it would be sent to the SPIA for perusal and onward submission to the DPIP.   The SPIA after necessary perusal and satisfying with the implementation, monitoring, repayment and sustainability aspects sends it to the DPIP for consideration and sanction.

 

CIF - Appraisal:

 

After Sub-Project reaches DPMU in full shape, it is handed over to the appraisal team.  The team generally consists of academicians, Ex-Bankers, Government Officials from Line Department, Professionals, Best Practitioners etc,.  They visit the village, interact with the people, verify the records of SHGs and their working.  They will also verify forward and backward linkages, impact by Sub-Project on environment and suggest remedial measures.  If the Sub-Project is economically viable and satisfies the three parameters of productivity, equity and sustainability, the same is recommended for sanction.  Normally all the Sub-Projects worth above and equal Rs.5,00,000/- the DPMU should entrust appraisal of the Sub-Project to a team  consisting of 3-4 individuals who are drawn from a panel of appraisers of DPIP.  For smaller projects, DPMU, at its discretion, may hire a team or an individual to carry out the appraisal.

 

 

 

Appraisal Parameters

1.      Institutional Appraisal:  SHG / CIG age, experience, thrift, credit record, cohesiveness, managerial capabilities, implementation capacity and sustainability of sub-project. 

2.      Participation and Commitment:  The sub-project would need to show how the process of participation has been applied by the CIG in the planning, identification, proposal, and implementation stages.  Commitment is expressed through beneficiaries contribution in cash and kind.

3.      Social Appraisal:  Percentage of beneficiaries expected to cross the poverty line, proportion of beneficiaries belonging to SC, ST, BC, & Others.  Giving details like Women headed families, additional employment generation, income generated, quality of life would be relevant. 

4.      Environmental Appraisal: Impact on natural resources safely for people, health risks etc.

5.      Technical Appraisal:  In consistency with national standards and cost effective and appropriate to local conditions.

6.      Economic Viability:  Economic assessment with reference to inputs / out puts (Income & Expenditure)

7.      Financial Viability :  To make financial viability assessment, costs per unit could be used.  Then we know costs for benefited each or one household for roads, sanitation, drinking water etc., or costs for benefiting one household for taking up irrigation of two acres, drip irrigation, horticulture crop in two acres, or costs for benefiting one household for taking up Dairy with two Milch Animals.

8.    Sustainability :  Give the detailed plan envisaged to ensure sustainability of SP.

  1. Operation & Maintenance :  Plan of groups to handle the O&M obligations.  Any provision made in the Budget towards repairs and maintenance.

 

Memorandum of Understanding:  The Sub-Project consists of two MOUs.  The first one is between the CIG and the SPIA.  The terms of MOU are:

 

  1. That the members will organize the group Programmes collectively and share the benefits equally.
  2. That they will abide by the rules and regulations of village organization. 
  3. That they will handover the assets to SPIA in case they fail to abide by the rules.
  4.  That the assets belong to the SPIA till the loan is closed. 
  5. That the assets will be insured.
  6. That the loan installment will be paid regularly.
  7. That the assets will not be disposed off without the prior permission from the village organization, and if disposed with permission they will repay the loan with interest.
  8. That they will arrange for the inspection of assets by VO, MS, DPMU or SPIA at any time.

 

The second MOU is between the SERP represented by DPIP DPMU and SPIA.  The SPIA will abide by the following:

 

  1. To convene regular meeting of CIG & SPIA on dates and places fixed in advance. 
  2. To take decision in a democratic way for implementation of Sub-Projects.
  3. To arrange for Capacity building.
  4. To do financial transactions in a democratic manner.
  5. To contribute the share of beneficiaries.
  6. To submit the Progress Report of Sub-Project to SERP in full shape and  intime.
  7. To complete the Sub-Project intime with mutual cooperation.
  8. To insure the assets.
  9. To share the benefits among the members.
  10. To permit the inspection of records by SERP or its representative.
  11. To make the members aware of the equal responsibility and to see that there is no additional burden on women and children, to pay equal and minimum wages and not to employ children.
  12. To refund the CIF amount incase the Sub-Project is not implemented.

 

The DPIP will have the following responsibilities:

  1. To release the CIF amount within one week of submission of Sub-Project in full  shape.
  2. To arrange for necessary training to CIG.
  3. To help the CIGs and SPIAs in getting necessary assistance from other agencies.

Disseminating awareness about CIF and its processes and building the awareness.

 

Abstract of Sanctions and Releases since inception of the Project to as on 15-03-05

 

                                                                                                (Rs. In Lakhs)

Details of Sanctions

No.of Beneficiaries

Project cost

CIF share

CIF Releases

1.Income Generating Activities

76,306

6175.23

5257.91

4433.37

2.Social

Sub-Projects

77,159

664.71

662.13

521.67

3.Small Scale 

   Infrastructure

77,227

171.82

124.62

128.49

Total

2,30,692

7011.76

6044.66

5083.53

 

 

Sanctions for the financial year 2004 05 (1-04-04 to 15-03-05)

 

(Rs. In Lakhs)

Details of Sanctions

No.of Beneficiaries

Project cost

CIF share

CIF Releases

1.Income Generating 

   Activities

51,204

2,391.53

2,093.21

2,078.00

2.Social Sub-Projects

60,624

329.09

327.58

248.33

3.Small Scale 

   Infrastructure SPs

30,621

34.64

17.78

15.05

Total

142449

2755.26

2438.57

2341.38

 

 

IMPORTANT ACTIVITIES UNDER TAKEN BY THE PROJECT UNDER CIF

SINCE INCEPTION OF THE PROJECT TO AS ON 31-03-05

(Rs. In Lakhs)

S.

No.

Name of the Activity

No. of families benefit-ed

Project cost

CIF share        

CIF releases

Extent in Acres

I

Income Generating Activities(IGA):

 

 

 

 

 

1

Milch Animals

2,285

569.25

508.04

209.29

--

2

Irrigation and Horticulture

1,153

334.27

248.35

126.81

1534.21

3

Land purchase and Leasing

1,917

625.41

562.86

562.86

3374.11

4

Groundnut pre-harvest Intervention

20,938

574.17

530.05

517.76

--

5

Bengal gram Pre-harvest intervention

676

23.25

22.04

22.04

--

6

Sheep Rearing

2,936

587.40

528.66

473.84

--

7

Ram Lamb rearing

180

34.68

31.21

29.77

 

8

Micro Plans

33,473

3093.00

2533.18

2243.62

--

9

Help Line cases

63

7.15

6.25

6.25

 

10

Collective Marketing

4,781

20.70

18.63

18.63

--

11

NTFP Collection & Marketing

5,168

35.70

32.13

28.43

--

13

Support to Artisans

1,538

123.40

110.90

96.85

--

14

Support to other I.G.As

1,198

146.86

125.61

107.21

--

 

Sub Total (2328 - SPs)

76,306

6175.23

5257.91

4435.37

--

II

Social Sub Projects:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basivinis

770

60.84

60.84

54.59

--

 

Destitutes and single women

45

4.50

2.25

2.25

--

 

Sex Workers

62

5.16

5.16

5.06

--

 

Try Cycles

537

16.65

16.65

16.65

--

 

Soukaryam

10,525

165.39

165.39

165.39

--

 

Food Security Scheme (34 Mandals)

30,315

87.57

87.57

87.57

--

 

Other support extended under Social Sub Projects

34,905

324.60

324.27

190.16

--

 

Sub Total  (393 - SPs)

77,159

664.71

662.13

521.67

--

 

III

Support to Economic Infrastructure:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bio Gas Plants

300

16.12

5.40

5.40

--

 

Smokeless Chulhas

9,792

17.13

5.76

5.76

--

 

DCBC Centres 3 (Kadiri,Hindupur and Kalyandurg)

9,000

35.46

35.46

35.46

--

 

Bulk Cooling Units 1 (building construction at Mudigubba)

1,000

0.90

0.90

0.90

--

 

Milk BCUs 2 (Gooty & Peddavadugur)

4,354

39.63

27.60

43.00

----

 

MS Buildings 2 (Peddavadugur & Gudibanda)

10,123

12.00

3.25

3.25

--

 

Video Cameras 32 Mandals

10,898

14.88

14.88

13.88

--

 

Rural Provisional Stores 4

17,008

9.50

8.45

3.20

--

 

Other INF Sub Projects

14,752

26.20

22.92

17.64

--

 

Sub Total (139 SPs)

77,227

171.82

124.62

128.49

--

Grand Total:  (2860 SPs)

2,30,692

7011.75

6044.67

5085.53

--

 

Sub-Project related analysis:

So far DPMU has sanctioned 2,860 Sub-Projects consisting of all the sectors viz IGA, INF and SS activities. Following is the Sector wise analysis of the Sub-Projects sanctioned.

Sector

No of

Sub-Projects

CIF Amounts Released

Rs. In Lakhs

IGA

2328

4435.37

INF

139

128.49

SS

393

521.67

Total

2860

5085.53

 

Beneficiary Contribution Accounting Status

Beneficiary Contribution cash and kind contribution has been accounted for by way of passing journal entries as and when UCs are received in this office. The following amount has been taken into CIF ledger as on 31.03.2005.

Cash  :   65,53,009/-

Kind  :    75,29,620/-

            Total : 1,40,82,629/-

 

Utilization certificates status as on 31-03-05

Total CIF Released

 

Utilization Certificates
Receivable till date
(Rs.in lakhs)

Utilization Certificates
Received till date

(Rs.in lakhs)

Pending UCs
(Rs.in lakhs)

Remarks

1

2

3

4 (2-3)

5

5085.53

5085.53

3224.76

1860.77

As most of the CIF SPs were sanctioned in Jan.05, Feb.05 and Mar.05 the CIF SPs are yet to be  grounded.

 

 

 

CIF Sub-Projects Ageing of Pending UCs as on 31.03.05

 Sl.

No

Period during which CIF Amount
Sanctioned

No. of
Sub-Projects

CIF Amount Released
(Rs. In Lakhs)

Remarks

1

May March, 05

824

1860.77

As most of the CIF SPs were sanctioned in Jan.05, Feb.05 and Mar.05 the CIF SPs are yet to be grounded.

 

New livelihood interventions/Marketing interventions and some achievements:

 

 Red gram procurement & Marketing:

Procurement of Red gram has been taken up in two mandals at Atmakur and Peddavadugur with 9 procurement centers with an estimated procurement of 250 qtls.  Achievement as on date is as follows:

(1)        Mandals                                                          -          2

(2)        No. of VOs                                                    -           9

(3)        No. of procurement centers                             -          9

(4)        No. of Habitations covered                                -          18

(5)        Total No. of Beneficiaries                                 -          1000

(6)        No. of Quintals procured                                -           187.53

                        Atmakur Mandal                                 -           70 Qts

                        Peddavadugur                                     -           117.53Qts

Profit Margin:

 Amount spent

Atmakur          -           5 VOs            -           70 Quintals      -           Rs.     93, 566

Peddavadugur- 4 VOs            -           117.53 Qts     -           Rs. 1, 71, 798

 

Atmakur           -           Profit                            -           Rs.4,650/-

Peddavadugur- Profit                           -           Rs.7,350/-

Total profit                 -           12,000/-                      

 

 


 

DPIP IKP ANANTAPUR NTFP ACTIVITY PROGRESS REPORT

1.Kanuga                                 : 3556 Kgs.

2. Kunkudu                              : 3169 Kgs.

3. Tamarind seed                      : 300 Kgs.

4. Kallibar                                : 3953 Kgs.

5. Chinthabark              : 7690 Kgs.

6. Mushti ginjalu                       : 40 Kgs.

7. Padapathri                : 320 Kgs.

NEEM SEED COLLECTION & MARKETING:

Anantapur District has a very good potential for collection and marketing the neem seed on large scale.  Survey has been conducted in 37 mandals and about 15,000 members are found to be involved in collection of neem seeds.  But due to lack of marketing facilities they are facing problems in marketing the produce with meager price.  In view of the above initially collection of neem seed is taken up in 16 mandals with 86 procurement centers for the benefit of 5,233 beneficiaries with a financial assistance of Rs.16.29 Lakhs.  Action plan for 2005-06:- It is planned to extend this scheme to cover 565 villages in 37 Mandals by establishing 210 procurement centers involving an amount of Rs.40.00 Lakhs.  

LIVELIHOOD STRATEGY

Construction wage labour

In Anantapur district there is a heavy demand for construction wage labour.  Hence special efforts are being made to identify the construction wage labour in the mandals where they are concentrated.  To identify such concentrated areas, one-month time was spent and a project report was prepared. Parigi, Madakasira and Beluguppa are the three supply mandals where as Hindupur, Kadiri, and Anantapur Mandals in the district are identified as demand mandals.  Among these six mandals, supply Mandals will be given preference for undergoing training on construction work and to provide them with connected safety tools by sanctioning CIF SPs. 

 

Through VOs and MS bodies identified 500 members for construction training programme tie-up with NAC, Hyderabad through Examination workers was selected for training they were yet under go technical training.  To impart required trainings for building awareness and basic skills to support Youth towards employment.

 

Construction Training 1st Batch

1. Masonry                   -           26

2. Bar bending              -           17

3. Plumbing                  -           27

4. Electrical                  -           29

            Total                            -          99 

      ..

Tied up with RDT, L&T and Wipro Constructions is made for their placements in the construction filed.  The second batch for Construction training is started on 07-03-2005.  It is under process and it will be completed on 10-07-2005. The details of trainees in each trade are as follows.

1. Masonry                   -           30

2. Painting                    -           30

3. Electrical                  -           30

                                                      

Total                         90 

                                                     

 

 

 

 

 

SCALING UP STRATAEGY FOR MARKETING AND  CRPs IN MARKETING.

 

The Livelihood Enhancement Action Plan will be prepared involving all the villagers at a centrally located place.  A set of exercises are conducted as a part of the LEAP, which leads to the emergence of the gaps, leakages, constraints that have to be addressed. The LEAP gets converted into comprehensive Sub-Project proposal by the Community, incorporating some or most of these ideas.

 

Self - supporting System:  

This is named as Buy and Save System to avoid market problems. We are thinking this is a new concept to introduce at ZS/MS/ VO level. Our SHG members are the producers and also they are the consumers. Hence either Micro or Macro Level initiatives are to be taken at district level by our Project Director.

 

Risk Management Mechanism Practices of Rural Poor:

Rural people are depending upon mainly on Agriculture, wage labour and Artisan service and horticulture. Now these people are facing risk. Study is focusing its attention on how the people are facing the risk and at what stage and how they are coping with risk since last five years.

 

Monitoring Systems set up:

After the CIF amount is released to the SPIA, follow up is done on grounding of units in bi- weekly APMs meet and Monthly CCs review meet. Grounding details and utilization certifications are obtained from time to time. At VO level assets verification sub committees are formed and they are verifying the assets periodically and recording the same in Village Organizations. Apart from this, in March- April 2004 asset verification teams were formed at DPMU level and all the assts were verified. This exercise of verification of assts by DPMU committees will be done periodically. Obtaining DCB position is monitoring recoveries and steps are being taken to improve the recovery position.

 

 Documentation:

The sub projects received in full shape are sanctioned after appraisal. The sub project proposal, appraisal report, administrative sanction letter and proceedings are kept in the file along with utilization certificate. Environmental appraisal is also done and the report is kept in the file. Four local auditors are empanelled and all the village organizations and Mandal Samakhyas are audited. One orientation programme was also organized on 04.06.04 for all the DPMs, APMs, CCs, and MBKs and empanelled audit parties on CIF documentation. Apart from the above four audit parties two more auditors are being identified for checking CIF documentation at DPMU level. 

 

CONVERGENCY WITH LINE DEPARTMENTS & PRIs

 

Convergence: 

In building the people institution promoted under IKP (Indira Kranthi Patham) convergence strategy has been planned and implemented in 63 Mandals.

 

CONVERGENCE:

With Line Department Functionaries:  IKP is closely working with line departments like APRLP, Animal Husbandry, Revenue, Panchayath Raj, Horticulture, Housing, Irrigation, Industries and ICDS for effective implementation activities.        IKP has conducted two-day orientation to all Mandal level functionaries like MPDOs, MROs, Village Secretaries, Agriculture Extension Officers etc., on concept of SHG, IKP.

 

With NGOs:  DPIP (IKP) is also strategically working with NGOs in the District.  It has facilitated all the NGOs to form in to a think thank.  Project Director, IKP will act as a convener.  All the NGOs were invited for two brain storming seasons to discusses on the possibilities of convergence and 10 Mandals were identified to initiate the efforts of convergences the among CBOs / MACs promoted by NGOs and Government on pilot basis APMAS is anchoring this event.

 

With PRIs:   As a part of strategy DPIP (IKP) has initiated various measures converge with PR Institutions.  All the Surpanches were given two day orientation on SHG concept, Panchayat Raj and 73rd amendment act and role of PRIs in strengthening CBOs. At village level Panchayat Raj members were involved in identification of poor implementation of programmes and sensitization on social issues.      

 

Social Risk Management: In Anantapur weather insurance initiative has been started in Hindupur Mandal on pilot basis collaboration with BASIX.  Zilla Samakhya of Anantapur District is negotiating with APSTC, LIC, and Oriental Insurance on Social Security measures.

 

Status of CBOs:

 

GENDER

Objectives:

1.      To strengthen Poor womens asset based livelihood security and economic opportunities.

2.      To reduce Gender gaps in human development, education, survival and nutrition.

3.      To expand access of women to gender specific basic needs like child care and women issues.

4.      To strengthen participation of Poor women in local self-Governance   Institutions.

5.      To reduce e-Gender specific risks and vulnerabilities of poor women and poor households.

6.      To reduce Gender stereotyping in project area.

7.      To un-Gender policies, schemes and implementation of line departments and bank concerned with Social Development.

8.      To reduce discrimination of poor woman on the basis of caste, religion, disability.

 

Key areas of concern and achievements

  1. Basivini System
  2. Jogini System
  3. Women Trafficking
  4. Destitute women

 

1. Basivini System

        1070 members were identified in 14 Mandals of Anantapur District.  They formed Sub Committee in Mandal Samakya to work on this specific issue at Mandal level.

        17 Social Sub-Projects have been prepared to provide relief measures to 528 Basivinis to tune of Rs.46,24,500 has been disbursed to the Basivinis.

 

2. Jogini System

        149 Joginis were Identified in 3 Mandals of Anantapur district.  They formed Sub-Committees in Mandal Samakya to work on this specific issue at Mandal level.

        4 Social Sub-Projects have been prepared to provide relief measures to 149 Joginis to a tune to tune of Rs.7,46,500/- has been disbursed to all the members.

 

3. Destitute women

        705 destitute women were Identified in 8 Mandals of Kadiri area. 

        One Social Sub-Projects have been prepared to 45 destitute to a tune of Rs.2,25,000.  The amount has been disbursed.

        618 Destitute women were identified who are houseless.  Prepared proposals for sanction of housing the Destitute women.  The proposals submitted to the Divisional Manager, Housing for sanction of houses to destitute women.

4. Women Trafficking

Text Box: Sheep loans to trafficking women
Text Box: Distribution of house site pattas to trafficking women

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rational

                     Poverty initiative project is process which aims at natural self managed CommunityBase Organizations as powerful means for Gender equity.

Human Resource Support

Gender is process oriented.  The effectively of the process is mainly depends on the availability of supports structure at each level.  Human Resource support is mainly required in promoting Gender equity.

Achievement made so far

COMPONENTS

 

GIRL CHILDREN ACCESS TO SCHOOLING

SOCIAL MOBILISATION

 

1. HEALTH COMPONENT

 

2. ECONOMIC SUPPORT

3. DISTRICT LEVEL COMMITTEE ON CONVERGENCE

 

4. LEAGAL AWARENESS

 

5. Social Issues Committees

 Social Issues Committees were formed VO level, MS members of Gram Panchayat.  Social Agenda has been circulated to all Community Based Organizations for detailed discussions in the GB & EC meetings to create awareness to final out possible solutions to the Social evils which are predominately continuing in the villages.  37 Mandal Samakya level Social issues Committees and 998 VO level SICS were formed.

 

 

6.Legal Awareness Camps:

14 legal awareness comps conducted at Mandal Samkyas level in 14 Mandals.  94 petitions have been received in these legal camps for redressed action is being taken by legal service authority for all these 94 cases.  Legal awareness camp conducted to all levels of filed staff to create awareness on various legal acts and legal services to the poor.

 

7. Trainings:

      In district level a Gender resource Group with 11 members is continued to work on Gender issues.

      32 DRPs and 11 Gender Resource Group members were trained on Gender concept and Gender Issues.

      29 CCs were t rained on 4 Gender concept and Gender strategies in IKP project.

      15 Mandal level Social issues Committee members were trained on Gender concept and Social issues.

      Two training of trainees were conducted on adolescence, life skills, domestic violence and Acts to the 8 IKP DRPs, 8 ICDs supervisors, 8 women teachers and 8 Panchayat Secretaries in Kadiri area.

 

8. Family counselling Centres

The Gender strategy in IKP project envisages that poor Communities are able to achieve poverty alleviation through self managed Grass Roots Institutions by harmonizing   the concerns of men & women. It helps to increase the autonomy of women over their own lives.

Women leaders had several experiences in dealing with domestic violence, marital disputes, dowry harassment expressing the need for Institutionalizing system by setting up of family counselling centres.

Somandepalli & Chilamathur Mandals have been establishment of family counselling centres at Mandal Samakya level.  Identified 20 Para legal workers in each mandal.

5 Social Sub-Projects has been prepared by Mandal Samakyas and submitted to the IKP office.  Each project cost of Rs.1,19,000/-.

 

9. Day care centres

As part of Social CIF implementation, it is proposed to established child-care centres in the villages for taking care of the children of rural working women (mostly agricultural labour/daily wage labours/self employed). 

These centres will work from 9.00 am to 5.30 pm which will reduce the anxiety and give enough leisure for the women.  It provides time to the women to concentrate on their productive activity.

CIF Details

Sl.

No.

Name of the Mandal

No.of centres

Total No.of Children identified

Social CIF Amount

1

Chilamathur

13

549

17,84,240

2

Somandepalli

10

796

21,97,910

3

Nallacheruvu

6

265

7,94,240

 

Total

29

1610

47,76,390

 

CONVERGENCE

 

Facilitation /Technical /Expert support:

 

Sustainability of the Interventions

All the committees like Social Issues Committees and Family Counseling Centres intended for woman issues eradication are to be evolved and managed by the poor themselves.  The committees will take change of development process even after the project period is ended.

 

Strategy for 2005-06

Key interventions to be supported.

Activities

 

District Specific Interventions

  1. Formation of Anti Trafficking Committees and training.
  2. Awareness on HIV/AIDS
  3. Convergence with UNICEF Project.
  4. Prevention activities and eradication of women trafficking.
  5. Mainstreaming the victims.

 

Report on Health Nutrition & Disability Activities

 

HND components are implemented in 5 Mandals on pilot basis in the district.

  1. Somandepalli
  2. Parigi
  3. Chilamattur
  4. Lepakshi
  5. Gorantla

 

Total 5 HND CCs and 21 development workers were positioned.

 

Identification of disabled persons and groups formation

Total 3,105 disabled persons were identified in 5 HND Mandals 84 groups were formed up to the March 2004 with 791 disabled persons.  From March,2004 to February, 2005, 259 groups were formed with 2741 disabled persons.  Till to date 280 groups were formed with 2,960 disabled persons. Still 145 disabled persons are to be covered under the SHG fold.

 

Physically Handicaped

Visually impaired

Speech/Hearing impaired

Mentally Retarded

1672

425

602

410

 

Left out:

145 persons with disability were still left out.

Mandal Vikalangula Samakyas:

5 Mandal Vikalangula Samakyas were formed and conducting monthly                  GB/EC meetings regularly on fixed dates.

 

Capacity Building:

        Total 239 SHGs received awareness on HND component.  Total 7,17 leaders of Vikalangula Sangams were trained on leadership 250 members are trained on community health education.

        40 days training completed for development workers and CCs on disability development.  They have given training in various therapy interventions such as Physiotherapy, Speech therapy, ADLs, Orientating mobility training, play therapy etc.

 

Regional trainings:

Regional trainings were conducted for 3 districts for generic CCs and HND CCs at Anantapur district.

12 Districts CDWs and CCs were trained on disability component.

 

Convergence Meetings:

5 HND convergence meetings were conducted with line departments at Mandal level. One district level convergence meeting level at Anantapur including DM & Ho, ICDS, DRDA, Indira Kranthi Patham-DPMs.  Purpose of convergence meeting is to involve the development in implementing the authorities.

Rehabilitation Activities:

110 members were received physiotherapy, 103 members received speech therapy, 61 members were received mobility training.  Total 128 members were given daily living skills.  23 members undergone surgeries for harelips.  25 children were included in integrated playing activities. Daily living skills imparted to 128 members, school admissions to 60 members. Club foot operations were conducted for 18 members

Medical Certification Camp:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

            Medical camp was conducted for issuing the medical certificates for school children.

            Multi purpose medical certification camps were conducted in Chilamathur & Parigi Mandals for adults.  Dates were finalized for Lepakshi on 24th April, 2005, Gorantla on 14th May, 2005 and Somandepalli 29th, May, 2005.  929 members were undergone assessment and issued certificates during the camp.

 

Subprojects:

 

Micro credit plans were undertaken to Assess and enhance the livelihoods of disabled persons through subprojects.

 

IGA:

Mandal Name

Amount
Beneficiaries
Chilamathur

7,80,000

80

Lepakshi

45,000

47

Somandepalli

8,92,000

139

Parigi

9,80,000

114

Gorantla

3,96,000

47

Total

30,93,000

427

 

                 2 children mobilized adopted to use local resources to develop the appropriate technology such as paralled bars, corner seats , push carts to use for their sitting and mobility purpose.  This activity done by the parent involvement at the village level.

 

No of members benefited under various scheme:

Try-cycles                    - 78                  Rice Coupons               - 559

M.C.                            - 1535              AAY                            - 130

Pensions                       - 210                Ration Cards                   -70

Scholarships                 - 16                  Special Schools               -94

 

 

 

Social Subprojects:

Mandal Name

Assistance provided

Amount

 in Rs.

Somandepalli

Tricycles

Medical Camp

Sanitation

1,61,200

16,500

51,850

Parigi

Tricycles

Sanitation

Medical Camp

2,20,100

1,32,200

13,600

Gorantla

Tricycle

Medical Camp

43,400

15,000

Chilamattur

Medical Camp

Club foot

Tricycles

10,000

60,000

1,20,900

Lepakshi

Medical Camp

Club foot

Tricycles

10,000

1,00,000

1,08,500

 

Case studies

556 case studies were conducted for follow up actions.

Health and Nutrition:

 

Two Mandals were selected for implementing health and nutrition (Parigi & Lepakshi)

Community Health Activist:

Community health activist is a community health worker who works on health issues monitored by V.O. and MMS.  Total 80 members were identified as community health activists.  These people were oriented on their roles and responsibilities.

 

Community Health Activist Orientation:

60 members were oriented by the CCs on roles and responsibilities and 36 members oriented by Dr. Arole Model Jamkhed.

Health sub committees:

 

        Health sub committees were formed in model V.Os.  3 to 4 members were elected as health sub committee by V.O. members.

        These Health Sub- Committees members had undergone training by Dr.Arole Model at Jamkhed.

 

Health PRA & needs assessment:

Health PRAs were completed in two Mandals, to assess the needs of the community based on their health issues.  In these areas health like requirement of inputs / trainings and generation of Social subprojects were identified.

 

Convergence meetings at Mandal level with Line Departments:

Convergence meetings were conducted in two Mandals for institutionalization of with Line Departments.

 

 

Nutrition and Health Days:

Nutrition and health days were finalized in Lepakshi & Parigi Mandals through convergence meeting with line departments (Medical & Health).

 

Gynic Camps:

Gynic camps with STD clinics were conducted in 4 mandals.  On an average 350 members were treated.  The 4 mandals are Kadiri, Gandlapenta, Nallacheruvu and Beluguppa.  Follow up action has been started in Beluguppa Mandal.  41 cases identified as serious cases, they were given the amount of Rs. 5,920/- for prior tests to surgery.  A tie-up arrangement with RDT is on process for referral cases. 

 

CHA Trainings:

12  CHAs from Model VOs had exposure at Jamkhed from 2 HN Mandals.  28th & 29th of every month in these two HN Mandals trainings will be imparted to CHAs with the help of Line Departments.

 

HIV trainings:

o       Total SHGs 6,666 were trained on HIV/AIDS.  63 Mandal Resource Persons were trained.  939 Village Resource Persons were trained in 24 mandals.

o       CHA & Health Sub -Committees were given training on HIV.

o       3 VOs received training inputs on hygienic measures on nutrition education.

o       CHAs were trained on TB to act as DOT providers by RNTCP in two HN Mandals.

 

Trainings to VOs

The following areas were given training to Village Organizations at Village level.

1.      Childhood illness

2.      Antinatal Care & Postnatal Care

o       High risk  pregnancy

o       Personal hygiene in adolescents

o       Importance of Breast feeding

 

3. Health awareness sessions in Model VOs

o       Communicable diseases

o       Care of new born

o       TB/HIV &Total 194 SHGs were given training on HIV /AIDS at Village level in these two HN Mandals. 

IEC

Total 7 times IEC related activities were conducted in these Mandals on Pulse Polio, HIV/AIDS & TB

Subprojects:

For Case manager at district level,  proposal was submitted.  Case manager looks after the referral cases from PHC at district hospital premises.  Case Manager will be selected and monitored by Zilla Samakya.    Health risk fund was generated in 8 model V.O. Out of 12 Model VOs. 

Therapeutic Interventions:

IKP DPIP staff concentrates on Therapy Interventions to train the parents and other family members.  The physical achievements give here under

Physio Therapy                                                             -           110

Speech Therapy                                                           -           103

Orientation on mobility                                      -           61

Activities on daily living skills                             -           128

Referred for surgeries                                       -           23

Special school and regular school admissions     -           25

 

FINANCE

 

Financial Monitoring Systems in DPIP :

The financial system that has been designed by the SERP, Hyderabad is being followed in the DPIP (IKP), Anantapur.  There is an Account section in DPIP (IKP), Anantapur which includes Accounts Officer, Senior Assistant and Accountant. The Accounts section is accountable both for receipt of funds and for all releases made in connection with the implementation of the project initiatives in the district. It will also play a roll of supervising the Book Keeping systems of CBOs i.e., Mandal Samakhyas and Village Organizations. It also monitors the utilization of funds for the given purposes both at District Level and CBOs Level.  he Accounts section in DPIP will maintain supervise and monitor two kinds of budgetary systems or funds flow systems supported by proper books of accounts.   Firstly it maintains the required books for accounting the receipts and expenditure at District Level.  Secondly it causes the Mandal Samakhyas to maintain two types of books of accounts. One for Accounting for the General Budget received for maintenance of the Mandal Samakhyas under Institution and Human Capacity Building Component of the Project for this the following books of accounts are maintained.

 

1. Cash Books                                     1. General Budget 2. CIF        

3. Seed Capital  (wherever necessary)

2. General Ledger                                 1. General Budget 2. CIF

            3. Seed Capital (wherever necessary)

3. Loan Ledgers                                   1. CIF 2. Seed Capital (Wherever necessary)

4. Bank Pass Books                             Separate Bank Account to be maintained for                                                                 General and CIF

5. Receipt Books                                 

6. Voucher file

7. Stationery Register

8. Furniture Register

 

For grounding of Sub-Projects sanctioned under CIF a separate bank account will be opened and a separate set of books like CIF Sub-Project Cash book, CIF Loan Ledger and CIF Recovery Register are maintained.  With regard to release of General Budget to the Mandal Samakhyas, for every quarter proposals are obtained from the Mandal Samakhyas giving the details of budget required for each and every head like Meetings, Trainings, Salaries, Office expenditure etc.,. After necessary perusal budgets are released to the Mandal Samakhyas for which Utilization Certificates along with the details of expenditure are obtained from the Samakhyas for booking the expenditure at District Level duly issuing the proceedings for adjustment of budgetary advances given to the Mandal Samakhyas.  Proposals for general budget for the ensuing month will be collected on 20th of every month at the MNAs meeting conducted regularly.

 

To regulate and to have control over the expenditure the Project Director will issue necessary authorizations to the Mandal Samakhyas for withdrawing the required amounts to meet the expenditure. After incurring the said authorized expenditure the Mandal Net Work Assistant shall prepare the utilization certificate supported by the expenditure details and explain them to MS Leaders, who on satisfying with the details would forward them to the Project Director.  At the time of verifying the UC, if any amounts are said to have been incurred with out authorization, the same will be disallowed from the Utilization Certificate by informing the fact to the Mandal Samakhya.

 

To observe financial discipline in Mandals and Village Organizations, a team consisting of Accounts Officer, two DRPs and one Accountant is formed. The team will visit to the mandals, verify the Books and records of MS / VO bodies. The records of MS / VO bodies will be verified and prepare receipts and payments up to the end of the month. If any amounts found to be incurred improperly, the matter will be settled then and there it self.  If the team detects any amounts of fraud or misappropriation, the same will be reported to the Project Director for its recovery besides taking suitable necessary action.

 

There will be 3 Master Book Keepers in the Mandals with each of them looking after proper maintenance of all records of the VO bodies in their cluster of villages.  The MBKs concerned are made responsible to guide both the VO Animators and also the SHG book keepers and ensure proper book keeping in the entire cluster. Once in a month a meeting with the MBKs, MNA and VO Animators will be held at MS Level and all the records will be verified and doubts raised by them will be clarified. 

 

For smooth running of MS / VO bodies, with regards to maintenance of accounts, circulars from this office are being issued regularly.

A meeting of all MNAs of the Mandals is being conducted APD cluster wise between  25th to  30th of every month by the Accounts wing to clarify any doubts raised by Mandal Net Work Assistants with regard to maintenance of records, incurring of expenditure from Mandal Budget, submission of UCs for CIF Sub-Projects and General Budget.

 

Beneficiary Contribution Accounting Status:  Beneficiary Contribution cash and kind contribution has been accounted for by way of passing journal entries as and when UCs are received in this office. The following amount has been taken into CIF ledger as on 31.03.2005.

Cash  :   65,53,009/-

Kind  :    75,29,620/-

            Total : 1,40,82,629/-

 

 


 

Bank Linkages for CIF:   So far an amount of Rs.191.67 Lakhs has been secured under CIF bank linkage programme under Income Generating Activities.

 

CIF Sub-Project related analysis:

So far DPMU has sanctioned 2,860 Sub-Projects consisting of all the sectors viz IGA, INF and SS activities. Following is the Sector wise analysis of the Sub-Projects sanctioned.

 

 

           

Sector

No of

Sub-Projects

CIF Amounts Released

Rs. In Lakhs

IGA

2328

4435.37

INF

139

128.49

SS

393

521.67

Total

2860

5085.53

 

Utilization certificates status as on 31-03-05

 

Total CIF Released

 

Utilization Certificates
Receivable till date
(Rs.in lakhs)

Utilization Certificates
Received till date

(Rs.in lakhs)

Pending UCs
(Rs.in lakhs)

Remarks

1

2

3

4 (2-3)

5

5085.53

5085.53

3224.76

1860.77

As most of the CIF SPs were sanctioned in Jan.05, Feb.05 and Mar.05 the CIF SPs are yet to be  grounded.

 

CIF Sub-Projects Ageing of Pending UCs as on 31.03.05

 

S.

No.

Period during which CIF Amount
Sanctioned

No. of
Sub-Projects

CIF Amount Released
(Rs. In Lakhs)

Remarks

 

 

1

May March, 05

824

1860.77

As most of the CIF SPs were sanctioned in Jan.05, Feb.05 and Mar.05 the CIF SPs are yet to be grounded.

 

 

 

Statement showing the Ageing of Outstanding Advances as on 31.03.2005

 

Sl. No.

Name of the Activity / Person

Below 3 Months

Between
4 to 6 Months

Above 6 Months

TOTAL

 

1

2

4

5

6

7

 

I.  ADVANCES FOR PIP:

 

1

M/s Excel Academy of Computers, ATP

 

 

2255

2255

 

SUB-TOTAL:

0

0

2255

2255

 
                     

 

 
 
ICT  e-Seva

Objectives:

      With IT facilities the villages also will improve in all respects at par with urban areas:

      Now that the rural people are unable to know the development or not able to know the latest information as the urban people have such facility with the provision of IT facility the rural people also know any information / development at par with urban people.

      Effective and meaningful Government services for the rural people can achieved with the IT facility.

      The main aim of Rajiv Internet Village facility that by introduction of the IT facility for the rural area is that the revaluation of knowing the district of affairs incidents that occur in the country.

      Quick remedy and settlement of rural problems by the transparency of the Government policies.

      With the local language facility of IT will reduce the gap between the people of rural and urban areas.

      E-Seva will develop the awareness of the rural people in their village condition.

      By the e-Seva facility the children of rural will gain the knowledge equal with the children of urban.

      The adult education is also can be achieved through the e-Seva centers.

      By the e-Seva centers the rural population can develop their health habits and social better living.

      With the introduction of e-Seva centers rural people also can pay electricity bill and Panchayat Tax, Vehicle Tax etc., in the e-Seva centers.

 

Reduction of Poverty through this programme:

 

      The main draw back of poverty in rural population is due to lack of education, education can be given by this e-Seva centers with the education the rural people will progress in their economical condition.

      The e-Seva centers and good quality commodities can eradicate the adulteration in pesticides, seeds, and fertilizers / seeds can be supplied by our e-Seva centers.

      With the establishment of e-Seva centers the rural people can pay their electricity bills in the e-Seva centers and they need not travel a long distance for this purpose. 24 hours of service can be given by our e-Seva centers.

      The rural people who are suffering with the diseases need not spent much amount by going to distance urban places and can gain the Tele- medicine facility through our e-Seva centers. 

      By educating the rural people on the health services the prevention health problems can be achieved by our e-Seva centers.

      The product of their rural people can be sold at centers profitable rates wherever the good market and demand is available can be know by our e-Seva centers.

      The programmed of the Government which are good and profitable to the rural people can be know through our e-Seva centers and thus the living condition of rural people can be improved. 

      The complaints and the grievances of the rural people can be focused / brought to the notice of the concerned officers and can be redressed by this the unnecessary expenditure / time can be saved.

      By introduction of adult education through our e-Seva centers the rural people will know what is good and what is bad and the awareness among them can improved and they will not chatted by any body.

 

Achievements in Phase1

      As per the orders issued by SERP, 17 Mandal Headquarters have been identified for establishing e-seva centers under Phase-I.

      17 Women Candidates were selected as operators for these 17 identified centers.

      All these 17 identified women candidates as operators for e-seva centers were trained at JNTU, Hyderabad for 7 days.

      AP ONLINE at Anantapur again trained all these 17 operators for 2 days and the required software was also supplied.

      Computers with furniture have been supplied to all these 17 identified e-seva centers.

      For these 17 e-seva centers, the additional requirement like, Scanner, Printer, and Camera etc. are to be procured.  Quotations as per the guidelines given by SERP have been obtained.  Joint Collector has to finalise the purchase process.

PHASE-II

      During Phase.II, SERP has issued instructions to identify 2 e-seva centers in each of the CCs cluster and also operators at the rate of two per center.

      Totally, 400 lady candidates were identified by MS/VO through simple written test and keeping in view the other guidelines like, age, qualifications etc.

      These identified 400 operators are to be trained.

      As per the instructions issued by the Joint Collector, review meeting was held with the connected line department officials to know the status.

      Formally, the Joint Collector, Anantapur, launched e-seva center at ATMAKUR.

        In obedience to the instructions issued by the Joint Collector, Anantapur, the supervision and monitoring of functioning of all Rural Kiosks (RSDP) centers were also taken over.

      Instructions from the District Collector are to be issued to all MROs to get the services of e-seva centers to issue Caste, Date of Birth, Nativity certificates.

      A.P.Online/Shakti/HLL software package were loaded in all RSDP centers.

      Applications for allotment of PASSPORT have been supplied to all RSDP centers.

      MPHS data is also loaded in RSDP Centers.

      25 RSDP (Rural e-seva) opened in Anantapur District

      A.P.Online/IShakti/Hindusthan Liver Limited software package were loaded in all e-Seva centers.

 

Coordination with line departments:

      APCDCL for the purpose of electricity bill collection

      APSRTC for the purpose of Bus Ticket and Bus pass

      DPEP for the purpose of children education.

      Revenue for the purpose of issuing caste and Nativity certificate and land records

 

Action Plan for 2005-06

      Peripherals required for 17 e-seva centers are to be procured.

      Refresher Training is to be given to these 17 trained e-seva operators for 2 or 3 days.

      Internet Connection is to be given from BSNL to these 17 centers.  Letter of request has been given to the BSNL authorities to provide INTERNET connections.

      MS officer bearers and members are to be briefed on the utility factor of  E-seva centers.

      The departments that are going to use the services of e-seva are to be enlightened on the utility/service factor and charges are to be fixed for each operation.

      ALS cassettes are to be obtained from DPEP for exclusive use by the children in the e-seva centers on nominal charges.

      VO and MS accounting process, MIS reports are to be computerized at E-seva centers.

      Checks and balances are built is the system to prevent misappropriation by Kiosk operators.  The system works on upfront Deposits.

      Comprehensive Fidelity Insurance will be taken for all Rural Kiosk operators covering all types of frauds money transit from Kiosk to Bank, robber, theft.

      Non-refundable deposits of Rs.5000/- to be pooled & placed with Directors, EDs to meet a loss or Pilferage by Operators.

      Director, e-Seva will enter an agreement with CMD, Transco to the effect guarantee for Collection made by Kiosks.

      Opening of accounts with UTI Bank, in order to enable payment services, each operator will have to take DD in his / her name for Rs.10,000/- (minimum) and Rs.5000/- per operator to be pooled up at District level and send a DD in favour of Director, EDs, Hyderabad.

      APTS is working with TCS on issuing Digital Certificates and Hardware key to all operators without which accessing data line in not allowed.

      All Rajiv Operators need to sign up MOU with AP On Line to act as Franchisee and deliver services using AP On Line Software.

      Each Rajiv Operators shall have an ID No. and an identity card to authenticate to the citizens as authorized operator.

      To provide glow sign Boards to all Rajiv Operators.

 

Key activities:

 

To give a training to all e-Seva operators and posting them in their respective centers.

To mold the e-Seva centers as a model center. To establish the coordination with the all line departments.

 

LAND

LAND PURCHASE SCHEME

The World Bank Mission reiterated that the need for CIFs has to be completely demand driven.  To ensure that sub-projects proposed and implemented under CIF are demand driven, communities are also provided with required information on alternate livelihood opportunities available for them.  Despite this awareness, there is a growing demand for land-based activities by poor community, since land is treated as secure and permanent economic asset.  Not only that land is a productive asset, which gives economic benefits without totally using up them.  Therefore, many a poor beneficiary requested to finance for providing land to them through CIF.  But, it is indicated that Bank does not finance and support purchase of land.  However, the mission indicated that land leasing is a possibility through CIF, vide Para 12 of component II - Community Investment Fund (page No.3) of AIDE MEMOIRE of the Supervision Mission from December 4-14, 2001.

 

Accordingly, land leasing has been taken up as economic activity under CIF.  The Endowment lands are purchased by the District Scheduled Castes Service Cooperative Society Ltd., Anantapur and make them available for lease.  The landless poor persons who are formed into CIGs will make a request through CIF proposals for obtaining these lands on lease for 15 years through SPIA.  The lease period for 15 years has been fixed to secure the tenancy rights to help the CIG members take up the land development and derive the benefits from the land on continuous basis during the lease period, as the CIG members have particularly insisted upon this aspect.  The sub-project proposals are appraised and sanctioned by DPIP under CIF-IGA.  The SPIA enters into a lease agreement with the SC Corporation and pays the 90% of the Project Cost towards lease rent.  In turn the CIG members will enter into an agreement with the SPIA and repay the lease amount in fifteen annual installments. 

 

During the year 2002 an extent of 3374.11 Acres covering 1917 beneficiaries was purchased by IKP funds through SC Corporations.  The entire land was purchased from Endowment Department in 17 Mandals.

Sl. No

Name of the Mandal

No. of Villages

No. of CIGs

No. of Members

Extent in Acres

CIF Amount

Kind/ Labour

 

1

Atmakur

6

7

87

174.13

2,937,800

3,26,422

 

2

B.K.Samudram

2

2

22

33.60

498,000

55,600

 

3

Bathalapalli

3

6

69

136.01

2,462,100

2,73,567

 

4

Beluguppa

5

17

199

410.95

6,953,410

7,72,674

 

5

Brahmasamudram

2

3

50

69.81

1,431,140

1,59,050

 

6

Bukkapatnam

2

2

12

18.06

361,200

40,140

 

7

Gooty

7

9

99

200.40

3,409,280

3,78,806

 

8

Gorantla

1

1

4

7.89

142,020

15,780

 

9

Gummagatta

5

12

173

219.42

4,249,310

4,72,235

 

10

Kalyandurg

12

16

236

481.63

8,513,340

9,44,680

 

11

Kambadur

8

17

236

421.34

6,041,020

6,71,219

 

12

Kanaganapalli

1

2

30

64.11

805,150

89,510

 

13

Kudair

9

17

218

433.08

7,085,330

7,87,495

 

14

Peddavadugur

1

3

63

86.00

1,810,000

2,01,110

 

15

Rayadurg

2

2

30

51.10

919,800

1,02,200

 

16

Tadimarri

2

3

31

53.70

902,600

1,00,288

 

17

Vidapanakal

7

19

358

512.88

7,764,920

8,63,475

 

 

TOTAL

75

138

1917

3374.11

56,286,420

6,254,251

               

 

 

ACTION PLAN FOR THE YEAR 2005-06 UNDER LAND PURCHASE SCHEME

Out of Rs.2053.00 Lakhs allotted under CIF for the year 2005-06 to Anantapur District an amount of Rs.200.00 Lakhs is proposed to take up under Land Purchase Scheme for the ensuing financial year 2005-06.  Out of this Rs.200.00 Lakhs 60% will be spent on purchase of land and 40% of may be spent on providing infrastructure like bore well, energisation and provision of inputs for the initial year. Accordingly an amount of Rs.120.00 Lakhs can be spent on lands.  An extent of 750 Acres of land may be purchased for this year.

 

An extent of 157.01 Acres of private land was identified in 4 Mandals covering 8 villages.  In Tanakal village and extent of 28.87 Acres was identified under this scheme for the allotment of Gunjuvari Palli Village H/o.Tanakal.  The Ground Water feasibility Certificate and land suitability Certificate were obtained.  The land is good fertile red soil.  Regarding the feasibility of Ground Water it is certified that an extent of 9 to 10 Acres will be irrigated from 2 different points in the above land.  The Village Organization of Gunjuvari Palli also identified the beneficiaries.  Regarding the other private lands Ground Water Department authorities were addressed for issuing Ground Water feasibility Certificate.  During the meeting held on 08-12-04 on Land Purchase Scheme Collector has decided to take up only Endowment lands under land purchase Scheme.  Accordingly the APMs and Mandal Samakhya excluding the 17 Mandals covered during the year 2002 were addressed to convene the meetings of Village Organisations and prepared the list of Beneficiaries.  To increase the pace of the process during this financial year it is also decided to form the teams for verification of lands and to find out the suitability of lands, water feasibility and other legal matters as it was done during the year 2002.  The team may consist the following members.

1.       Revenue Divisional Officer / Deputy Collector Team leader

2.       Geologist from Ground Water Department/I.D.C.

3.       Mandal Agriculture Officer concerned

4.       Mandal Revenue Officer, concerned

5.       Executive Officer/Inspector of Endowment Department

 

LAND ACCESS

Under land access programme an extent of 392.55 Acres of Government land was assigned to 155 members in three Mandals of N.P.Kunta, Kadiri & Gandlapenta.  In N.P.Kunta and Talupula Mandal large extent of Government land is available. The land could not be assigned as it was notified as Project affected areas in N.P.Kunta Mandal.  To assign the lands to eligible Sivai Jamdars and eligible poor Special Survey work has been taken up.  So far an extent of 8336.20 Acres of land has been surveyed in 8 villages of N.P.Kunta Mandal.

YOUTH EMPOWERMENT

Objectives

         Identification of youth belonging to POP and Poor families in all the mandals of the district.

         Diverting the youth life from Naxalism and Factionism

         Promoting the income of the  poor families by providing sustainable livelihood to the youth in their families.

 

Mandate

In all the mandals the rural youth of the poor families is identified and a training program is organized for skill upgradation and employment is also created according to their interested fields.  This process is planned for all the intervention of IKP.

 

Need for this Component

In the villages the youth are diverted towards faction and Naxalism in this district.  The poor families are suffering a lot with low incomes and unemployment to their youth is worrying them a lot.  So to provide them some livelihood so that they could earn something and to stand upon with good livelihoods this intervention of creation of Jobs to rural youth of poor families is taken up by on project.

 

Construction Training for youth

Through VOs and MS bodies identified 500 members for construction training programme tie-up with NAC, Hyderabad through Examination workers was selected for training they were yet under go technical training.  To impart required trainings for building awareness and basic skills to support Youth towards employment.

Construction Training 1st Batch

1. Masonry                   -           26

2. Bar bending              -           17

3. Plumbing                  -           27

4. Electrical                  -           29

                        Total                         99 

 

Tied up with RDT, L&T and Wipro Constructions is made for their placements in the construction filed.  The second batch for Construction training is started on 07-03-2005.  It is under process and it will be completed on 10-07-2005. The details have been furnished in each trade is as follows.

1. Masonry                   -           30

2. Painting                    -           30

3. Electrical                  -           30

Total                         90 

 

Tie up with LABS, Hyderabad:  Livelihood Advancement training for Employment Generation - Partnership between DPIP (IKP) and Dr.Reddys Foundation of Livelihood Advancement Business School, Hyderabad.

 

Tasks & Responsibilities:  Selection of the very needy youth between 18 25 years of age from the weakest economic category to enable them gain access to sustainable livelihood through appropriate training programs.  Organize and deliver skill development training program for the youth for 3-4 month periods depending on the specificity of modules, including life skills development, job related technical skills, workplace competencies and work readiness preparation, job shadowing, apprenticeship and placement network support.

 

Budget:  DPIP (IKP) approves a total budget of Rs. 7,50,000 @ 3000/- candidate for Anantapur District for the specific exercise undertaken by Dr. Reddys Foundation. The budget amount will be paid in advance of every activity.

 

Present Status:  Dr.Reddys Foundation has undertaken survey for identifying the potential opportunities available in Anantapur District for providing gainful employment to the youth.  The selection of youth will be completed in this month.  The training will be started from the 1st week of May 05.

 

What has been done so far?

Target:

         To arrange training programmes for 1000 youth people and provide jobs to them

         Tie-ups with Reddy labs, CTTI, JANSIKHAN, SAMSTHAN for trainings.

 

Cost of the training programme: Total expenditure incurred for 1st batch training is Rs.14,49,300/-.

 

Sustainability of the Initiatives:

Reputed Companies like L&T, Wipro, IJM, etc., have given placement to our trainees.

 

District specific interventions:

 

     Identification of poor youth, SHG wise in villages.

     Approvals from VOs & MSs

     Identification of activities.

     Identification of trades

     Identification of institutions

     Appraisal by the institution capacities

     MOU between institution and projects

     Conduct of trainings

     Placement

     Skill upgradation

     Self confidence, personality development

     Opportunities for rural youth

     Sustainable livelihood for the rural families

 

Coordination with other units at SERP

Identification and appraisal of famous Institutions for conducting major training programmes.

The VO and MS approve the above activities and trainings were given to youth.  Employment is created and hence sustainable livelihood is created and thereby increased the incomes of the poor families.

 

Through e-Seva : 17 Mandal Headquarters have been identified and supplied with computers and required furniture for establishing e-seva centers under Phase-I.

 

      17 Women Candidates were selected as operators and were trained at JNTU, Hyderabad for 7 days. AP ONLINE at Anantapur again trained all these 17 operators for 2 days and the required software was also supplied. For these 17 e-seva centers, the additional requirement like, Scanner, Printer, and Camera etc. are to be procured.

      Under Phase-II identified 420 lady candidates were identified by MS/VO through simple written test and they are yet to trained. The supervision and monitoring of functioning of all RSDP centers were also taken over and A.P.Online/Shakti/HLCs software package were loaded in all these RSDP centers.

Coordination with line departments:

      APCDCL for the purpose of electricity bill collection

      APSRTC for the purpose of Bus Ticket and Bus pass

      DPEP for the purpose of children education.

      Revenue - For the purpose of issuing caste and Nativity certificate and land records. 

 

ARMY RECRUITMENT:-   Army selections are scheduled to be held in the  1st week of  July, 2005 in the Anantapur District.  Special focus is laid by the Project for creating awareness among the rural youth about this army recruitment and sees that more number of rural youth will be selected to the Army by giving wide publicity through beat of tom-tom and through Mandal Samakhyas.

RICE CREDIT LINE  (Food Security)

 

Food Security system: Project recognizes that food security of the poor as the basic unassailable human right. To convert and operationalize the concept of decentralized food distribution mechanism, it was realized that a community managed food security system having a line of food credit will enable the poorest of the poor to borrow from the grain banks in the lean months. It will also decrease dependence of the poor on the fleecing village moneylenders. Under the unique pilot project, grain will be distributed under rice credit scheme recoverable with an interest. This helps the poor to get adequate food, which enables them to have food security for themselves.

 

OBJECTIVES:

 

           Which is managed by the community itself. 

            season and avoid purchase of food grains at higher prices.

            Poor.

           the poor.

 

Food Security Scheme is implemented to ensure that all the poor shall utilize 100% Rice allocation under Public Distribution System and meet the balance requirement through collective purchase of food grains like Rice/Broken rice/Jowar from open market.

 

Issues and Methodologies:

Two important aspects in the Rice Credit Line are

      Focused on 100% lifting of rice from the Public Distribution System and

      Purchase from the open market.

 

One major problem facing by the rural poor with PDS is that FP shop dealers offer Rice to the people only for 3 or 4 days or maximum of one week. The rural poor are unable to purchase rice with in this short time other wise they have to borrow from the local moneylenders to purchase the Rice.  As the price of Rice available in the open market is higher the rural poor cant afford to purchase.  For the above two problems Rice credit line gives an excellent solution.

1.      Purchasing rice from the FP shop leader collectively a day or two well in advance so that no person faces the problem of lack of money.

2.   Since the Rice given through FP shop is not sufficient, the poor has to purchase some quantity of Rice from open market. For this a purchasing committee is formed at VO level for purchasing the Rice at millers on wholesale basis there by distributing the Rice among them. This reduces the cost of Rice considerably.

 

Methodology:

 

After having discussions at SHG level the SHG leaders will take indent from the respective SHG members in two ways.

     List of the members who require the amount for purchasing PDS rice.

     List of the members who are in need of the food grains (Rice/Broken rice Ragi/Jowar) from the open market in addition to  PDS.

     For the members who require the food grains from open market, small amount of advance is collected from the members as per the decision taken by the VO.

     From SHG member wise indent along with the advance amount is passed on to the VO. The VO collects indent and advance amount from all the SHGs.

     Amounts required for the purchase of Rice from PDS is given to SHGs by way of Cheques or the VO directly pays to the FP shop dealer thus facilitating the members to get Rice from FP shop with in the time frame.

 

As per the indent for the purchase of food grains from the open market the VO forms a Purchasing Committee consists of 5 members. This committee will have a survey of Rice millers/Land lords/Rice stockiest in and around. This committee will negotiate with the above parties to get good quality of rice at a fair price. After completion of negotiations by fixing the price and quantity they lift the Food grains to the respective village and it will be distributed on the same day or on the next day according to their convenience.

Fixation of price will be done prior to distribution on the basis of expenditure incurred for the transportation and hamali and other miscellaneous expences. While fixing the price a margin of 0.25 1.00 Rupee per Kg is added and at the same time it is confirmed that the fixed price is lesser than the local merchant.  The VO pays 25 % of the net profit to the Mandal Samakya.

 

Before implementing the programme an MOU will be entered by the VO with MS stating that in any case if the VO stops the program, the entire amount along with interest will be paid to the Mandal Samakya.

 

Achievements including recoveries:

So far 5 mandals started the purchasing the Food grains and process is going on in 29 mandals.

            Total quantity of food grains purchased             : 857 Q

            No. of  beneficiaries covered                                        : 1792

            No. of  villages covered                                                : 17

            Amount utilized spent                               Rs.: 7.15 Lakhs

           

In Tadipatri mandal an amount of Rs. 2.48 Lakhs has been recovered from 6 villages and the MS has earned a profit of    Rs.15,480/-.  Again second time purchase is started in this mandal.

 

Accounting Systems/Monitoring mechanisms

Separate Books of Accounts are being maintained for the implementation of Rice Credit Line.

                        At SHG Level:

                        Individual passbook

                        SHG indent book

                        Loan ledger & Cashbook

 

                        At VO Level :

                        Abstract

                        VO cashbook

                        Loan ledger

                        VO MIS

                       

At MS Level:

                        MIS

 

Monitoring Mechanism:

 

At DPMU level Livelihood Associate and DPM (LH) are responsible in facilitating and proper functioning of the Committees, conducting the Orientation camps, Training to the Animators in writing the books of accounts and in training the Committees formed by the CBOs.

 

CHILD LABOUR

Objectives:    

          Promotion of Girls Education

          Eradication of Girl child labour

          To reduce the drop out rate of girls in the age group of 8-14

          No child shall go to work.

          All children shall go to school.

          School is the right place for the children.

Initiatives adopted for Elimination of Child Labour: Project is addressing the eradication of child labour in the following manner:

        Build on the foundation of Social Mobilisation.

        Build consensus on the issue of total abolition of child labour through universalisation of Elementary Education.

        Withdraw children in 9-14 years age group from work.

        Prepare children withdrawn from work to classes according to their age.

        Enroll children in 5-14 years in schools and ensure their retention in  schools.

        Build processes for ownership of the programme by all the stakeholders.

        Build local institutions for protection of child rights.

        Achieve convergence with other projects (like DPEP).

Statistical Data

Population

Children in the age group of 5-10 years                         4,00,248

Children in the age group of 11-14 years                                   3,01,733

In School

Children in the age group of 5-10 years                         3,90,667

Children in the age group of 11-14 years                                   2,82,471

Out of School

Children in the age group of 5-10 years                              9,578

Children in the age group of 11-14 years                                      19,262

Action Points

                    Action Plan is to be prepared Gram Panchayat wise for relief, rehabilitation and mainstreaming of child labour, with the following objectives.

Rehabilitation plans for child labour

 

 Achievement under Girl Child Education:

1) APSWREIS and DPIP Residential Schools:  Four Girls Residential schools are functioning at Hindupur, Amarapuram, Brahmasamudram and Gooty mainly to cater to the mainstreaming needs of Non Residential Bridge Course Programme. National child labour project schools, and inmates of Residential Bridge Course Schools run by DPIP-IKP.  IKP would strive hard to achieve the objectives like

          Promotion of girls education through Non-Residential, Residential Bridge Courses and by running Residential NCLP schools.

          Eradication of girl child labor as the members of SHG, Village organization and Mandal Samakhyas have been mobilizing drop out girls from their habitation and admitting them in RBCs and playing a lead roll in mainstreaming and reducing the drop out rate among girls in the age group of 8-14.

2) Bridge Course Residential Schools:-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

        9 Bridge Course Residential Schools are functioning at Peddavadugur, Thumukunta of Hindupur (M), Brahmanapalli of Kudair Mandal, T.V.Tower Colony (Lenin Nagar), Anantapur and at Telugu Bala Mahila Pragathi Pranganam of Anantapur, Kaluvapalli of Beluguppa Mandal, Rayadurg, Kadiri and Penukonda.

 

 

3) NCLP SCHOOLS

        2 NCLP Schools with a strength of 100 each are functioning at Gandlapenta and Hindupur.

 

MAIN STREAMED DETAILS:

        5,645 Out of School Children are mainstreamed.

 

Monitoring and Learning (M&L) System

Performance Indicators:  Designing a comprehensive MIS to facilitate concurrent and transparent input-output monitoring is a complex task.   The complexity arises from several sources. First, the hierarchy of the project from SHG to SPMU necessitates continuous two-way flow of information without sacrificing the managerial principle of unity of command.   Second, the information generated needs to be collated and consolidated at each level, before transmitting the essential aggregated information to the next higher level.   Third, the potential diversity among the mandals renders the design of a uniform MIS difficult.   Therefore, identifying the information needs of a demand driven project is a formidable problem.  Not only the present requirements but also the future needs of data would have to be identified and provided for in the MIS.

 

An appraisal of the performance of the component:  A good MIS should provide adequate and reliable information to the project management for undertaking mid-course corrections.   It should enable the management to review of different functional and geographical units and undertake inter-temporal comparisons.   The MIS information should facilitate planning, strategizing and trouble shooting at the different levels of the project.   A MIS is not an end in itself, but a helpful guide to the management.  Its contribution ultimately depends on the quality of information that it produces.

Sustainability of the initiatives:  In order to minimize the complexities, and make MIS a useful tool of input-output monitoring, the following key principles may be considered for adoption in the development of MIS.

          Information needs of different management units including the level of detail/aggregation of each variable, from SHG to DPMU, shall be determined in a participatory manner;

          The system should provide for the flow of information, both up and down the management hierarchy in such a way that those required to collect and transmit the information should also receive the feedback;

          All the potential users of information should be facilitated to understand the utility of MIS; and their role in the collection, recording and transmission of information;

          The information system should fit into the project management system i.e., information flow needs to match the organizational structure;

          The responsibility for collecting/reporting MIS information should rest with the project staff/paid MTCs, MBKs and other activists and bookkeepers and the CBO should not be burdened with the project MIS;

          The MIS should not impose a high workload at any level in the organization, time spent by the staff to collect, record/transmit information should not exceed 5 to 10% of their working time;

          Further, there should not be information overload at any level.  Eventually, the number of parameters on which information is generated should not be too many.  The MIS should be flexible enough to be modified as the project unfolds itself.  It should also provide some space for incorporating district specific information, and

          The system should be tested and piloted in the project distrticts before adopting it for wider use.

 

Strategy for 2005-06.

The Process of MIS Development

The normative principles of MIS development indicated above formed the basis for the development of MIS.

Identification of Indicators

On the basis of the previous experience and taking into account the hierarchy of management, four levels were identified for tracking and transferring information.  These include the SHG, the VO, the MS and the DPMU.  Then for each level, appropriate staff or paid activists who could be made responsible for collecting, recording and reporting information were identified on the basis of the initial experience in the project.

 

Preparation of draft MIS Registers and Reporting Formats

The four levels of management identified were found to be maintaining multiple registers and records in which project data was recorded.  Information frequently collected and recorded in a variety of registers is expected to be entered into the specified MIS registers, which become the basis for periodic reporting.   The designated staff for reporting at the specified interaval then uses the information recorded in the MIS registers and using the pre-designed reporting formats.   Information frequently collected and recorded in a variety of registers is expected to be entered into the specified MIS registers, which become the basis for periodic reporting.

 

Changes, which took place in the project

        The MVTC was introduced in all the mandals.

        The position of MTC was created to oversee the functioning of the MVTCs.

        The system of MBKs was introduced in all the Mandals.

        Appointment to the positions of APM was also completed.

        New accounting systems and the associated books of accounts and registers were introduced at the SHG and VO levels.

        The strategy of CIF itself underwent certain changes. 

        Bank co-financing had become a compulsory feature of CIF financing.

        The so-called micro-credit plan came to be introduced at the SHG level to identify the individual financial/credit needs.  The CIF repayment picked up and the need for recycling CIF funds arose.

 

Sustainability of the interventions.

MIS Registers and Formats

Any MIS system would be relevant only as long as the information collected is used for managerial decision-making.  The MIS Registers, which are being used, are indicated below.

1.            PIP/BPL Register:  The PIP/BPL register provides a master list of all poor and POP households to be mobilized into the project fold and provided various services.  Largely based on the PIP document, the list remains by and large static with marginal additions and deletions.  The CC is responsible for maintaining the register.  The CC may take the help of MRP in maintaining the register.

 

2.            The DAP Register:  The DAP register provides a master list of all differently abled persons to be mobilized into the project fold and assisted.  The list is largely based on the PIP.   However, additions can be made to the list by the CC as the social mobilization progresses and new cases are detected.  The MRP/activist is expected to support the CC in updating this register.

 

3.            SHG Register:  The SHG register provides basic information about the SHG.  The register has to be updated continuously by the CA/BK/GL from month to month. Apart from feeding information into the MIS, the register enables monitoring by the VO.

 

4.            MF Register:  MF registers records information on SHG and VO micro-finance.  It is expected to be updated on a quarterly basis by the VBK/MBK.   The register provides micro-finance information to the MS.

 

5.            MTC Training Register:  The MTC training register is a record of all training programs organized in the mandal at the MS, VO and the community level.   It is expected to be maintained on a continuous basis.   The register provides information necessary for the quarterly report of the MTC.

 

6.            CIF Register:  The CIF register is a record of CIF-SPs proposed, sanctioned and implemented.   The information is provded sub-project wise and feeds into the MIS.   It also facilitates monitoring by VO and MS.

 

7.            CC Daily Activity Register:  It is a record of CCs daily activities.   The CC is expected to record all the activities that he undertakes on a day-to-day basis.   It is more of a diary and the districts could adopt their own versions of it.   The details recorded in the register would feed into the CCs MIS register.

 

8.            APM Daily Activity Register:  It is a record of APMs daily activities.   The APM is expected to record all the activities that he undertakes on a day-to-day basis.  

 

9.            CC MIS Register:  The daily activity register of the CC feeds into the MIS register.   The register is to be updated every month.  This forms the basis for the CCs monthly MIS report.

 

10.        DPMU Register:   The DPMU register is a record of all key project activities originating at the district level including information about the sub-projects, capacity building programs organized and human resources engaged.   The DPM (M&L) is expected to update the register on a monthly basis.   The register is expected to feed into the monthly MIS from DPMU to SPMU.

 

MIS REPORTS:  The critical element in the MIS is the reporting system.  A multi-level reporting system, consistent with the management structure of the project is evolved.  The system involves reporting of information on important parameters in a user-friendly format by the project staff at multiple levels.   The formats can be used for planning and decision-making at all levels.   Determining the frequency of MIS reporting is another important element in the MIS formats design i.e., two types of reporting are to be provided for monthly and quarterly.  The monthly reporting system is meant for information on SM, IB, Livelihoods, Gender and Communications.   First, the CCs report in the prescribed format on a monthly basis to the APMs.  The APM in turn consolidates the data for each mandal and report to the DPMU. The DPMU transmits the mandal wise information to the SPMU, after adding information that originates at its level.  The quarterly reporting system is suggested for capacity building of CBOs and developments in micro finance.

 

COMMUNICATION AND PARTNERSHIPS

 

Various Activities under taken:-

  1. Collection of paper clippings published in various Daily newspapers and keeping them for the perusal of the P.D., and submission to SERP.
  2. Collection of Success Stories and submission of best ones to SERP.
  3. Conduct of trainings to Kalajatha teams.
  4. Organising Kalajatha programmes at District level.
  5. Conduct of Press tours and Press Conferences.
  6. Conduct of exhibitions.
  7. Publication of Pham plates and posters on IKP programmes and various government developmental activities.

 

ENVIRONMENTAL ASPECTS

Achievements:

  1. All Community Coordinators have taken training on poverty & environment and environment management framework.
  2. Out of 8 ERG members trained at present only  4 ERG members are working on appraising of Sub-Projects.
  3. All level-II Sub-Projects are assessed by ERG group.
  4. Proactive environmental friendly sub-projects are implemented (Smokeless Chulhas, Bio-gas plants, drip irrigation sprinklers).
  5. For level II Sub-Projects beneficiaries are following the mitigative measures.
  6. CEE staff completes 6 Rounds of supervision filed visits.
  7. Desk appraising of all level I , level II Sub-Projects.

 

Action plan for 2005-06

  1. Planned to work on Non-Pest Management in 52 Villages of 13 identified Mandals.
  2. Planned to organize fertilizers with the support NGOs (like RDT, RIDs, REDs).
  3. Planned to impart training programme on Environment management framework by using awareness material at Mandal level.
  4. Planned to conduct supervision filed visits once in every three months.

 

Best Practices/Success Stories/Challenges

 

I. BEST PRACTICES  -  DPIP-AASARA

District Primary Education Programme, Anantapur under School Health Programmes and with active Convergence of all the departments and under the guidance of the District Collector organized a Programme named ASARA.  Aasara Programme was an attempt to mainstream disabled children in the school group to regular education and rehabilitate them after treatment.  More than 18679 children were identified with various types of disabilities.

 

 

SHG group members, Village Organizations and Mandal Mahila Samakyas took keen interest to ensure cent percent attendance of disabled children at the camp through mobilization at habitation level.  Village Organization with the active cooperation of group members mobilized children along with the parents to the camp.  There were no Government funds ears marked for the camps.  Service was purely voluntary.  Village Organizations and Mandal Mahila Samakyas distribute food packets to the children and parents and in some Mandals like Peddavadugur, Hindupur have supplied medicines also for the camp.  This is only for the satisfaction of having done some thing good to disabled children.


II. DPIP-EDUCATION:

Objectives:

Bangaru Bata:

No children shall go to work.  All children shall go the school.  School is the right place for the children.   To attract out of school working children into school and to retain them up to an appropriate age and level of learning and to reintegrate children who have dropped out Non-Residential Bridge Course Programmes were organized in six Mandals under the name Bangaru Bata during 2002-03.

Sl.

No.

Mandal

No. of

Clusters

Children

Enrolled

Children mainstreamed

1

Bathalapalli

32

886

462

2

B.K.Samudram

25

527

248

3

Gudibanda

31

668

264

4

Hindupur

23

465

278

5

Madakasira

32

568

314

6

Peddavadugur

20

494

375

Total:

163

3608

1941

 

All these NRBCs have been run by lay Volunteers who are either Animators, SHG members of IKP.   About 1941 children have been mainstreamed through Bangaru Bata Programme.  In addition to the above Non-Residential Bridge Course Centres.  Two Residential Bridge Course Programmes for Girls with in take capacity of 100 each  at Peddavadugur and Thumukunta.  All the 212 children enrolled in these centres have been admitted into  four Residential Schools of APSWREIS  and DPIP and regular schools at different places with hostel accommodation.

 

NCLP:  During 2002-03 Mandal Mahila Samakya and Grama Ikaya Sanagam have run nine child labour project schools.

 

Sl.       

No.

Village

Mandal

 Children Enrolled

Children Mainstreamed

1

Korrapadu

B.K.Samudram

41

36

2

Madakasira

Madakasira

50

42

3

Haresamudram

Haresamudram

50

40

4

Bathalapalli

Bathalapalli

50

48

5

Malyavantham

Bathalapalli

50

38

6

Gudibanda

Gudibanda

50

47

7

Konakonda

Vajrakarur

50

45

8

Rekkamanu

Gandlapenta

50

41

9

Chinnampalli

Settur

50

46

 

 

 

441

383

 

Out of these 441 children enrolled in NCLP centres 383 children have been mainstreamed into regular schools and Residential Schools.

 

APSWREIS DPIP Residential Schools:

Four Residential Schools have been opened at Hindupur, Amarapuram, Gooty and Kalvapalli (Brahmasamudram) mainly to cater to the mainstreaming needs of Non-Residential Bridge Courses, Residential Bridge Courses and National Child Labour Project Schools, Girl child dropouts.  During 2003-04  three more Residential Bridge Course Schools have been opened with an in take capacity of 100 each at Brahmanapalli Kudair Mandal.  T.V.Tower Colony, Anantapur rural  Mandal and Telugu Mahila, Bala Pragathi Pranganam, Rapthadu Mandal.

 

During July and August special Residential Bridge Courses have been organized for S.C, dropout Girl children at Brahmanapalli 158 children and T.V.Tower Colony 100 Girls.  They have been coached for two months and admitted into V class in the four Residential Schools of the district.  IKP would strive land to achieve the objective of promotion of Girls education through Residential and Non-Residential Bridge Course and members of SHG Groups, VOs and Mandal Mahila Samakyas have been mobilizing dropout Girls form habitations to Bridge Schools and playing a lend role in mainstreaming and promotion of education among Gilrs.

 

III.HEALTH CARE OF SANITATION WORKERS THE ANANTAPUR EXPERIENCE

Healthcare services perform their noble duty in enhancing public health.  However they also produce wastes, which have the potential to cause infections and be hazardous to the public health in general and to the sanitation workers in particular.  

 

Backdrop of the problem:  There are 63 (of whom 37 are Men and 26 are Women) Sanitary Workers engaged in Government Hospital, Anantapur.  They dispose sewage, human anatomical wastes, waste sharps, out dated, contaminated and discarded medicines, solid wastes like body fluids, dressings, soiled plaster lines, beddings, cotton used in treatment, wastes generated from disposable items and liquid wastes generated from cleaning & washing of labs and wards and also chemical wastes. 

 

Defining the problem:   The persons engaged in hospital for maintenance of sanitation render their services by way of physically cleansing and removing the dirt and bio-medical wastes.  The pathetic situation is that the persons engaged in this activity hail from one particular community that has been looked down and suppressed for centuries together by the society. Unfortunately for checking unhygienic conditions and for protecting the health of the whole community, the persons of the given community have to bear the social degradation, segregation from the fellow human beings and lose the self-respect besides inviting the health hazards.  They clean the hospital premises including toilets and bio-medical wastes with their bare hands and without using any protective equipment, because of which they are prone to deadly diseases like, Hepatitis-A & B, T.B., HIV and so on.  

 

        

Risks for want of training and personal protective equipment:

The persons engaged in sanitation are not provided with any training, infrastructure and secure & protective equipment.  As a result while handling the wastes the sanitation workers are exposed to the un-hygienic and disease causing conditions.  No steps whatsoever have been taken for protection of their health.  On the social front, the persons engaged in sanitation works have been looked down, no respect or recognition has been given in-spite of their concern with the protection of peoples health.  As a result of this, if they are men they become drunkards, if they are women they cultivate the habit of chewing beetle leaves thereby weakening both their health and purse               

Infections from health care wastes:  Infectious wastes may contain any of a great variety of pathogenic microorganisms.  These pathogens may enter the human bodies through a number of routes like -

          Through a puncture, abrasion or cut in the skin

          Through the mucous membrane

          By inhalation

          By ingestion

Infections caused due to exposure to health care wastes and causative organisms:

Type of Infection

Examples of Causative organisms

Transmission Vehicles

Gastroenteric infections

Enterobacteria e.g. Salmonella, Shigella spp, vibrio cholerae, helminthes

Faeces / and or vomit

Respiratory infections

Mycobacterium tuberculosis measles virus, Streptococcus pneumoniae

Inhaled secretions saliva

Ocular infections

Herpes virus

Eye secretions

Genital infections

Neisseria genorrhoeae, herpes virus

Genital secretions

Skin infections

Streptococcus spp.

Pus

Anthrax

Bacillus anthrasis

Skin secretions

Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)

Blood, Sexual secretions

Septicaemia

Staphylococcus spp.

Blood

Viral hepatitis A

Hepatitis A virus

Faeces

Viral hepatitis B and hepatitis C

Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C viruses

Blood and body fluids

 

Present situation:  A gross violation of the rights of sanitary workers, not just as workers but also as human beings is noticed.  Their right to life and security of person is severely compromised by the work they do.    Hospital waste management procedures as currently followed in most hospitals expose sanitary workers to untreated infectious wastes and also to the risk of being infected with HIV, Hepatitis, Tuberculosis and other diseases.  Most of these workers are casual workers or workers on daily wages and from the weaker sections.  They do not have the ability to voice their grievances.  In Anantapur Headquarters Hospital there are 63 sanitary workers (of whom 26 are women) of whom 28 are contract staff, 25 are regular staff and 10 are thoties.

Details of workers are as follows:

Caste Category

Regular Staff

 

Contract Staff

Thoties

Total

Female

Male

Female

Male

Female

Male

Female

Male

SC

5

15

11

16

4

2

20

33

ST

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

-

BC

-

1

-